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COLTON, J.H.

Colton's Railroad & Township Map of the State of New York. with Parts of the Adjoining States & Canada

New York: Colton & Company, 1853. Full period color, 24 x 28 inches. Ornate decorative border. Folding into brown cloth covers, later paper label on front cover. Sales label for J.H. Colton & Co., 86 Cedar St., NY, on inside front cover.

One of Colton's "Railroad & Township Maps" series of the various states. The map bears the copyright date of 1852, which must have been the date of original publication. Statistical table giving census figures for 1840 and 1850 in upper left corner. The map was frequently updated and corrected, with several subsequent editions. Rumsey (179) lists an 1855 edition.

#3226$1,250.00
 
 
COOK, James (1728-1779); Joseph Bernard de CHABERT (1724-1805); and Charles Pierre Claret de FLEURIEU (1738-1810)

A Chart of the Banks of Newfoundland, Drawn from a Great Number of Hydrographical Surveys, Chiefly from those of Chabert, Cook and Fleuieu, Corrected and Ascertained by Astronomical Observations

London: "Printed for & sold by Robt. Sayer & Jno. Bennett", 25 March 1775. Engraved map. Table of astronomical observations. Tracks of Chabert and Fleurieu identified.

A fine chart of the Grand Banks, principally after the survey by Captain James Cook.

This fine chart of the Grand Banks, most of Newfoundland and the entrance to the Gulf of St. Laurence was published in the first part of the North American Pilot, the most thorough and detailed mapping of the Canadian territory ceded to Great Britain at the end of the French and Indian war. Following the war, surveys of the region were immediately ordered, as the waterways were deemed of vital economic importance to the inland fur trade. Among those selected for the task was James Cook.

"On 19 April 1763 James Cook, Master R.N.. was ordered by the Admiralty to proceed to Newfoundland 'in order to your taking a survey of the Parts of the Coasts and Harbours of that Island'" (Tooley & Skelton, p.177). His appointment would have been based, in no small part, on the glowing endorsement of his commanding officer, who had written to the Admiralty in December 1762 "that from my experience of Mr. Cook's genius and capacity, I think him well fitted for the work he has undertaken, and for greater undertakings of the same kind."

Cook started by surveying the northwest stretch of coastline in 1763 and 1764, then in 1765 and 1766 the south coast between Cape Ray and the Burin Peninsula, and in 1767 the west coast. Cook's work in the region allowed him to master the art of practical surveying and navigation, bringing his name to the attention of the Admiralty and Royal Society at a crucial moment in his career. Summoned to depart on what would prove to be the first of his three great voyages to the Pacific, the survey of Newfoundland and southern Labrador was finished by Michael Lane between 1768 and 1773.

"The charting of Newfoundland and southern Labrador by Cook, in the years 1763-7, and by his successor Michael Lane, in 1768-73, was unequalled, for thoroughness and method, by any previous hydrographic work by Englishmen; and it produced the first charts of this extensive and difficult coastline that could (in the words of a later hydrographer) 'with any degree of safety be trusted by the seaman'" (Skelton & Tooley). For Cook, his accomplishment led directly to his being commissioned to the Endeavor, launching his reputation as the greatest maritime explorer of his age, and perhaps of all time.

Cf. Skelton & Tooley, "The Marine Surveys of James Cook in North America" in Tooley, The Mapping of America; not in Kershaw, Early Printed Maps of Canada.

#25613$1,000.00
 
 
COOK, James (1728-1779, surveyor). - Robert SAYER & John BENNETT (publishers)

A Chart of the Straights of Bellisle with part of the coast of Newfoundland and Labradore [sic.] from actual surveys published by Permission of the ... Admiralty surveyed by James Cook 1766 and Michael Lane 1769

London: Robert Sayer & John Bennett, 10 May 1770 [but printed 1775]. Copper engraving on two joined sheets. Good condition. Sheet size: 25 x 45 1/2 inches (joined).

A spectacular chart from the survey that launched the career of Captain James Cook.

This fine map of Newfoundland and Labrador appeared in the first part of the North American Pilot, the most thorough and detailed mapping of the Canadian territory ceded to Great Britain at the end of the French and Indian war. Following the war, surveys of the region were immediately ordered, as the waterways were deemed of vital economic importance to the inland fur trade. Selected for the task were James Cook and Michael Lane.

"On 19 April 1763 James Cook, Master R.N.. was ordered by the Admiralty to proceed to Newfoundland 'in order to your taking a survey of the Parts of the Coasts and Harbours of that Island'" (Tooley & Skelton, p.177). His appointment would have been based, in no small part, on the glowing endorsement of his commanding officer, who had written to the Admiralty in December 1762 "that from my experience of Mr. Cook's genius and capacity, I think him well fitted for the work he has undertaken, and for greater undertakings of the same kind."

Cook started by surveying the northwest stretch of coastline in 1763 and 1764, then in 1765 and 1766 the south coast between Cape Ray and the Burin Peninsula, and in 1767 the west coast. Cook's work in the region allowed him to master the art of practical surveying and navigation, bringing his name to the attention of the Admiralty and Royal Society at a crucial moment in his career. Summoned to depart on what would prove to be the first of his three great voyages to the Pacific, the survey of Newfoundland and southern Labrador was finished by Michael Lane between 1768 and 1773. Their charts were first published in 1769 (under the title A Collection of Charts, but containing only 10 maps); in 1775, they were republished with additions by Jefferys within the first part of the North American Pilot.

"The charting of Newfoundland and southern Labrador by Cook, in the years 1763-7, and by his successor Michael Lane, in 1768-73, was unequalled, for thoroughness and method, by any previous hydrographic work by Englishmen; and it produced the first charts of this extensive and difficult coastline that could (in the words of a later hydrographer) 'with any degree of safety be trusted by the seaman'" (Skelton & Tooley). For Cook, his accomplishment led directly to his being commissioned to the Endeavor, launching his reputation as the greatest maritime explorer of his age, and perhaps of all time.

Skelton & Tooley, "The Marine Surveys of James Cook in North America" 13.XVII in Tooley, The Mapping of America.

#24781$8,500.00
 
 
COOK, James (1728-1779, surveyor)

A Chart of the West Coast of Newfoundland: surveyed by order of Commodore Palliser, Governor of Newfoundland, Labradore [sic] &c. &c.

London: Published by Permission ... by James Cook, printed for R. Sayer & J. Bennett, 10 May 1770 [but printed 1775]. Copper engraving on three joined sheets. Good condition. Sheet size: 21 5/8 x 69 1/2 inches (joined).

A spectacular chart from the survey that launched the career of Captain James Cook.

This fine and large map of Newfoundland appeared in the first part of the North American Pilot, the most thorough and detailed mapping of the Canadian territory ceded to Great Britain at the end of the French and Indian war. Following the war, surveys of the region were immediately ordered, as the waterways were deemed of vital economic importance to the inland fur trade. Selected for the task were James Cook and Michael Lane.

"On 19 April 1763 James Cook, Master R.N.. was ordered by the Admiralty to proceed to Newfoundland 'in order to your taking a survey of the Parts of the Coasts and Harbours of that Island'" (Tooley & Skelton, p.177). His appointment would have been based, in no small part, on the glowing endorsement of his commanding officer, who had written to the Admiralty in December 1762 "that from my experience of Mr. Cook's genius and capacity, I think him well fitted for the work he has undertaken, and for greater undertakings of the same kind."

Cook started by surveying the northwest stretch of coastline in 1763 and 1764, then in 1765 and 1766 the south coast between Cape Ray and the Burin Peninsula, and in 1767 the west coast. Cook's work in the region allowed him to master the art of practical surveying and navigation, bringing his name to the attention of the Admiralty and Royal Society at a crucial moment in his career. Summoned to depart on what would prove to be the first of his three great voyages to the Pacific, the survey of Newfoundland and southern Labrador was finished by Michael Lane between 1768 and 1773. Their charts were first published in 1769 (under the title A Collection of Charts, but containing only 10 maps); in 1775, they were republished with additions by Jefferys within the first part of the North American Pilot.

"The charting of Newfoundland and southern Labrador by Cook, in the years 1763-7, and by his successor Michael Lane, in 1768-73, was unequalled, for thoroughness and method, by any previous hydrographic work by Englishmen; and it produced the first charts of this extensive and difficult coastline that could (in the words of a later hydrographer) 'with any degree of safety be trusted by the seaman'" (Skelton & Tooley). For Cook, his accomplishment led directly to his being commissioned to the Endeavor, launching his reputation as the greatest maritime explorer of his age, and perhaps of all time.

Skelton & Tooley, "The Marine Surveys of James Cook in North America" 13.XVI in Tooley, The Mapping of America

#24782$10,000.00
 
 
[COOK, James (1728-1779)]. - Robert SAYER & John BENNETT (publishers)

A Draught of the Gut of Canso Between Nova Scotia and Cape Breton Island, Surveyed by the King's Ships in 1761. / A Plan of Port Dauphin, on the Eastern Side of Cape Breton Island, Surveyed in 1743. / A plan of Murgain or Cow Bay, on the Eastern Side of Cape Breton Island, Surveyed in August 1760. [published in: The North-American Pilot for Newfoundland, Labradore, the Gulf and River St.Laurence: being a collection of sixty accurate charts and plans, drawn from original surveys: taken by James Cook and Michael Lane, Surveyors, and Joseph Gilbert, and other officers in the King's service] [X]

[X]. London: Robert Sayer & John Bennett, 25 March 1775. Copper engraving on a single page (approx. plate area: 14 x 21 inches). Good condition, old vertical fold. Sheet size: 14 1/2 x 21 3/4 inches.

A spectacular chart from the survey which laid the foundation upon which Captain Cook's reputation as a surveyor and navigator rested.

At the conclusion of the French and Indian War, the British needed accurate charts of the territories that had been awarded to them in the Treaty of Paris. The areas that were of particular interest to the Admiralty included Labrador and Newfoundland.

"On 19 April 1763 James Cook, Master R.N.. was ordered by the Admiralty to proceed to Newfoundland 'in order to your taking a survey of the Parts of the Coasts and Harbours of that Island'" (Tooley & Skelton, in Tooley's The Mapping of America p.177). His appointment would have been based, in no small part, on the glowing endorsment of his commanding officer, who had written to the Admiralty in December 1762 "that from my experience of Mr. Cook's genius and capacity, I think him well fitted for the work he has undertaken, and for greater undertakings of the same kind".

"The charting of Newfoundland and southern Labrador by Cook... and by his successor Michael Lane ... was unequalled, for thoroughness and method, by any previous hydrographic work by Englishmen [and also allowed Cook to master the art of practical surveying and navigation, in a way that brought him to the attention of the Admiralty and Royal Society at a crucial moment. More immediately.] it produced the first charts of this extensive and difficult coastline that could (in the words of a later hydrographer) 'with any degree of safety be trusted by the seaman'" (Tooley & Skelton op. cit.).

Cook started by surveying the northwest stretch of coastline in 1763 and 1764, then in 1765 and 1766 the south coast between Cape Ray and the Burin Peninsula, and in 1767 the west coast. His work was interrupted by what was to prove to be the first of his three great voyages to the Pacific, and the work on Newfoundland and southern Labrador was finished by Michael Lane between 1768 and 1773. Thomas Jefferys used the charts by Cook and others to form the "Collection of Charts of 1769-70, a prototype ... for the celebrated North-American Pilot which was to be published in five English editions from 1775 to 1806" (Tooley & Skelton op,cit.). The present example is from Sayer and Bennett's 1775 edition (Tooley & Skelton's # 13).

Cf. Sabin, Dictionary of Books Relating to America 35966; Skelton & Tooley, "The Marine Surveys of James Cook in North America" 13.X in Tooley, The Mapping of America.

#24772$2,250.00
 
 
COOK, James (1728-1779); Michael LANE; and Joseph GILBERT - Thomas JEFFERYS, engraver (1719-1771)

A General Chart of the Island of Newfoundland with the Rocks and Soundings, Drawn from Surveys taken by Order of the Right Honourable the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, By James Cook and Michael Lane, Surveyors, and Others.

London: "Printed for Robt. Sayer & Jno. Bennett", 10 May 1775. Engraved map. Sheet size: 21 3/4 x 29 1/4 inches.

A classic chart published by Jefferys depicting all of Newfoundland, after the monumental surveys of Cook, Lane and Gilbert.

This fine chart of Newfoundland, the Gulf of St. Laurence and part of the coast of Labrador was published in the first part of the North American Pilot, the most thorough and detailed mapping of the Canadian territory ceded to Great Britain at the end of the French and Indian war. Following the war, surveys of the region were immediately ordered, as the waterways were deemed of vital economic importance to the inland fur trade. Among those selected for the task was James Cook.

"On 19 April 1763 James Cook, Master R.N.. was ordered by the Admiralty to proceed to Newfoundland 'in order to your taking a survey of the Parts of the Coasts and Harbours of that Island'" (Tooley & Skelton, p.177). His appointment would have been based, in no small part, on the glowing endorsement of his commanding officer, who had written to the Admiralty in December 1762 "that from my experience of Mr. Cook's genius and capacity, I think him well fitted for the work he has undertaken, and for greater undertakings of the same kind."

Cook started by surveying the northwest stretch of coastline in 1763 and 1764, then in 1765 and 1766 the south coast between Cape Ray and the Burin Peninsula, and in 1767 the west coast. Cook's work in the region allowed him to master the art of practical surveying and navigation, bringing his name to the attention of the Admiralty and the Royal Society at a crucial moment in his career. Summoned to depart on what would prove to be the first of his three great voyages to the Pacific, the survey of Newfoundland and southern Labrador was finished by Michael Lane and James Gilbert between 1768 and 1773.

"The charting of Newfoundland and southern Labrador by Cook, in the years 1763-7, and by his successor Michael Lane, in 1768-73, was unequalled, for thoroughness and method, by any previous hydrographic work by Englishmen; and it produced the first charts of this extensive and difficult coastline that could (in the words of a later hydrographer) 'with any degree of safety be trusted by the seaman'" (Skelton & Tooley). For Cook, his accomplishment led directly to his being commissioned to the Endeavor, launching his reputation as the greatest maritime explorer of his age, and perhaps of all time.

This general chart of Newfoundland would appear in editions of the North American Pilot, as well as the American Atlas.

Kershaw, Early Printed Maps of Canada 539; Phillips, A List of Maps of America 1208; cf. Skelton & Tooley, "The Marine Surveys of James Cook in North America" in Tooley, The Mapping of America.

#25614$1,000.00
 
 
[COOK, James (1728-1779)]. - Robert SAYER & John BENNETT (publishers)

A Plan of Chaleur Bay in the Gulf of St. Laurence, Surveyd by His Majesty's Ship Norwich in 1760. [published in: The North-American Pilot for Newfoundland, Labradore, the Gulf and River St.Laurence: being a collection of sixty accurate charts and plans, drawn from original surveys: taken by James Cook and Michael Lane, Surveyors, and Joseph Gilbert, and other officers in the King's service] [XIV]

[XIV]. London: Robert Sayer & John Bennett, 25 March 1775. Copper engraving on a single page (approx. plate area: 14 x 21 1/2 inches). Good condition, old vertical crease. Sheet size: 14 5/8 x 21 3/4 inches.

A spectacular chart from the survey which laid the foundation upon which Captain Cook's reputation as a surveyor and navigator rested.

At the conclusion of the French and Indian War, the British needed accurate charts of the territories that had been awarded to them in the Treaty of Paris. The areas that were of particular interest to the Admiralty included Labrador and Newfoundland.

"On 19 April 1763 James Cook, Master R.N.. was ordered by the Admiralty to proceed to Newfoundland 'in order to your taking a survey of the Parts of the Coasts and Harbours of that Island'" (Tooley & Skelton, in Tooley's The Mapping of America p.177). His appointment would have been based, in no small part, on the glowing endorsment of his commanding officer, who had written to the Admiralty in December 1762 "that from my experience of Mr. Cook's genius and capacity, I think him well fitted for the work he has undertaken, and for greater undertakings of the same kind".

"The charting of Newfoundland and southern Labrador by Cook... and by his successor Michael Lane ... was unequalled, for thoroughness and method, by any previous hydrographic work by Englishmen [and also allowed Cook to master the art of practical surveying and navigation, in a way that brought him to the attention of the Admiralty and Royal Society at a crucial moment. More immediately.] it produced the first charts of this extensive and difficult coastline that could (in the words of a later hydrographer) 'with any degree of safety be trusted by the seaman'" (Tooley & Skelton op. cit.).

Cook started by surveying the northwest stretch of coastline in 1763 and 1764, then in 1765 and 1766 the south coast between Cape Ray and the Burin Peninsula, and in 1767 the west coast. His work was interrupted by what was to prove to be the first of his three great voyages to the Pacific, and the work on Newfoundland and southern Labrador was finished by Michael Lane between 1768 and 1773. Thomas Jefferys used the charts by Cook and others to form the "Collection of Charts of 1769-70, a prototype ... for the celebrated North-American Pilot which was to be published in five English editions from 1775 to 1806" (Tooley & Skelton op,cit.). The present example is from Sayer and Bennett's 1775 edition (Tooley & Skelton's # 13).

Skelton & Tooley, "The Marine Surveys of James Cook in North America" 13.XIV in Tooley, The Mapping of America.

#24774$2,250.00
 
 
[COOK, James (1728-1779)]. - Robert SAYER & John BENNETT (publishers)

A Plan of Ristigouche Harbour in Chaleur Bay. Surveyed in 1760. by the King's Ship Norwich. [published in: The North-American Pilot for Newfoundland, Labradore, the Gulf and River St.Laurence: being a collection of sixty accurate charts and plans, drawn from original surveys: taken by James Cook and Michael Lane, Surveyors, and Joseph Gilbert, and other officers in the King's service] [XV]

[XV]. London: Robert Sayer & John Bennett, 25th March 1775. Copper engraving on a single page (plate area: 14 x 21 inches). Good condition, old vertical fold. Sheet size: 14 1/2 x 21 3/4 inches.

A spectacular chart from the survey which laid the foundation upon Captain Cook's reputation as a surveyor and navigator rested.

At the conclusion of the French and Indian (or Seven Years) War, the British needed accurate charts of the territories that had been awarded to them in the Treaty of Paris. The areas that were of particular interest to the Admiralty included Labrador and Newfoundland.

"On 19 April 1763 James Cook, Master R.N.. was ordered by the Admiralty to proceed to Newfoundland 'in order to your taking a survey of the Parts of the Coasts and Harbours of that Island'" (Tooley & Skelton, in Tooley's The Mapping of America p.177). His appointment would have been based, in no small part, on the glowing endorsment of his commanding officer, who had written to the Admiralty in December 1762 "that from my experience of Mr. Cook's genius and capacity, I think him well fitted for the work he has undertaken, and for greater undertakings of the same kind".

"The charting of Newfoundland and southern Labrador by Cook... and by his successor Michael Lane ... was unequalled, for thoroughness and method, by any previous hydrographic work by Englishmen [and also allowed Cook to master the art of practical surveying and navigation, in a way that and brought him to the attention of the Admiralty and Royal Society at a crucial moment. More immediately ] ... it produced the first charts of this extensive and difficult coastline that could (in the words of a later hydrographer) 'with any degree of safety be trusted by the seaman'" (Tooley & Skelton op. cit.).

Cook started by surveying the northwest stretch of coastline in 1763 and 1764, then in 1765 and 1766 the south coast between Cape Ray and the Burin Peninsula, and in 1767 the west coast. His work was interrupted by what was to prove to be the first of his three great voyages to the Pacific, and the work on Newfoundland and southern Labrador was finished by Michael Lane between 1768 and 1773. Thomas Jefferys used the charts by Cook and others to form the "Collection of Charts of 1769-70, a prototype ... for the celebrated North-American Pilot which was to be published in five English editions from 1775 to 1806" (Tooley & Skelton op,cit.). The present example is from Sayer and Bennett's 1775 edition (Tooley & Skelton's # 13).

Skelton & Tooley, "The Marine Surveys of James Cook in North America" 13.XV in Tooley, The Mapping of America.

#24773$2,000.00
 
 
[COOK, James (1728-1779, surveyor)]. - Robert SAYER & John BENNETT (publishers)

The Harbour of Trepassey with Mutton and Biscay Bays / The Road and Harbour of Placentia. By James Cook / St. Mary's Harbour. [published in: The North-American Pilot for Newfoundland, Labradore, the Gulf and River St.Laurence: being a collection of sixty accurate charts and plans, drawn from original surveys: taken by James Cook and Michael Lane, Surveyors, and Joseph Gilbert, and other officers in the King's service] [V]

[V]. London: Robert Sayer & John Bennett, 10th May 1770. Copper engraving with three maps on one single-page sheet (plate area: 14 x 12 inches). Sheet size: 21 7/8 x 14 5/8 inches.

A spectacular chart from the survey which laid the foundation upon which Captain Cook's reputation as a surveyor and navigator rested.

At the conclusion of the French and Indian War, the British needed accurate charts of the territories that had been awarded to them in the Treaty of Paris. The areas that were of particular interest to the Admiralty included Labrador and Newfoundland.

"On 19 April 1763 James Cook, Master R.N.. was ordered by the Admiralty to proceed to Newfoundland 'in order to your taking a survey of the Parts of the Coasts and Harbours of that Island'" (Tooley & Skelton, in Tooley's The Mapping of America p.177). His appointment would have been based, in no small part, on the glowing endorsment of his commanding officer, who had written to the Admiralty in December 1762 "that from my experience of Mr. Cook's genius and capacity, I think him well fitted for the work he has undertaken, and for greater undertakings of the same kind".

"The charting of Newfoundland and southern Labrador by Cook... and by his successor Michael Lane ... was unequalled, for thoroughness and method, by any previous hydrographic work by Englishmen [and also allowed Cook to master the art of practical surveying and navigation, in a way that brought him to the attention of the Admiralty and Royal Society at a crucial moment. More immediately.] it produced the first charts of this extensive and difficult coastline that could (in the words of a later hydrographer) 'with any degree of safety be trusted by the seaman'" (Tooley & Skelton op. cit.).

Cook started by surveying the northwest stretch of coastline in 1763 and 1764, then in 1765 and 1766 the south coast between Cape Ray and the Burin Peninsula, and in 1767 the west coast. His work was interrupted by what was to prove to be the first of his three great voyages to the Pacific, and the work on Newfoundland and southern Labrador was finished by Michael Lane between 1768 and 1773. Thomas Jefferys used the charts by Cook and others to form the "Collection of Charts of 1769-70, a prototype ... for the celebrated North-American Pilot which was to be published in five English editions from 1775 to 1806" (Tooley & Skelton op,cit.). The present example is from Sayer and Bennett's 1775 edition (Tooley & Skelton's # 13).

Skelton & Tooley, "The Marine Surveys of James Cook in North America" 13.V in Tooley, The Mapping of America..

#24776$1,500.00
 
 
[COOK, James (1728-1779)]. - Robert SAYER & John BENNETT (publishers)

Trinity Harbour / Carboniere and Harbour Grace / St. John's Harbour / Cape Broyle Harbour ...[published in: The North-American Pilot for Newfoundland, Labradore, the Gulf and River St.Laurence: being a collection of sixty accurate charts and plans, drawn from original surveys: taken by James Cook and Michael Lane, Surveyors, and Joseph Gilbert, and other officers in the King's service] [IV]

[IV]. London: Robert Sayer & John Bennett, 10 May 1770. Copper engraving with four maps on one single-page sheet (plate area: 15 x 11 1/2 inches). Good condition, old horizontal fold. Sheet size: 21 1/8 x 14 3/4 inches.

A spectacular chart from the survey which laid the foundation upon which Captain Cook's reputation as a surveyor and navigator rested.

At the conclusion of the French and Indian War, the British needed accurate charts of the territories that had been awarded to them in the Treaty of Paris. The areas that were of particular interest to the Admiralty included Labrador and Newfoundland.

"On 19 April 1763 James Cook, Master R.N.. was ordered by the Admiralty to proceed to Newfoundland 'in order to your taking a survey of the Parts of the Coasts and Harbours of that Island'" (Tooley & Skelton, in Tooley's The Mapping of America p.177). His appointment would have been based, in no small part, on the glowing endorsment of his commanding officer, who had written to the Admiralty in December 1762 "that from my experience of Mr. Cook's genius and capacity, I think him well fitted for the work he has undertaken, and for greater undertakings of the same kind".

"The charting of Newfoundland and southern Labrador by Cook... and by his successor Michael Lane ... was unequalled, for thoroughness and method, by any previous hydrographic work by Englishmen [and also allowed Cook to master the art of practical surveying and navigation, in a way that brought him to the attention of the Admiralty and Royal Society at a crucial moment. More immediately.] it produced the first charts of this extensive and difficult coastline that could (in the words of a later hydrographer) 'with any degree of safety be trusted by the seaman'" (Tooley & Skelton op. cit.).

Cook started by surveying the northwest stretch of coastline in 1763 and 1764, then in 1765 and 1766 the south coast between Cape Ray and the Burin Peninsula, and in 1767 the west coast. His work was interrupted by what was to prove to be the first of his three great voyages to the Pacific, and the work on Newfoundland and southern Labrador was finished by Michael Lane between 1768 and 1773. Thomas Jefferys used the charts by Cook and others to form the "Collection of Charts of 1769-70, a prototype ... for the celebrated North-American Pilot which was to be published in five English editions from 1775 to 1806" (Tooley & Skelton op,cit.). The present example is from Sayer and Bennett's 1775 edition (Tooley & Skelton's # 13).

Skelton & Tooley, "The Marine Surveys of James Cook in North America" 13.IV in Tooley, The Mapping of America.

#24775$1,850.00
 
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