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CUSHMAN, G. H.

An original ink and watercolour drawing of an American steam locomotive

[United States: circa 1875]. Original pen, ink and watercolour drawing on wove paper of a Mogul type locomotive, all within original ink ruled border, signed by the artist on the rail at the far right side. Sheet size: 18 1/8 x 32 1/2 inches.

An expertly rendered drawing of one of the most powerful locomotives from the golden age of steam locomotion in the United States.

The first American-built locomotive, the Best Friend, came into service in 1830. Lomomotive production reached its zenith in the decade following the Civil War, at the time of the present drawing. This "mogul" type locomotive is shown with cowcatcher and a 2-6-0 wheel configuration (2 small wheels at the front and six large driving wheels in the rear), a large headlamp with an American eagle emblem on its side, a wooden cab on which is neatly written "Mogul" and a riveted fire box below the boiler which shows a B within a six-pointed star within a circle. This powerful Mogul type locomotive was used primarily as a freight engine and was produced by the Baldwin Locomotive Works and Brooks Locomotive Works. The artist of the present drawing, G. H. Cushman, has signed his work at the bottom right on the rail.

#25908$4,850.00
 
 
D'ANVILLE, Jean Baptiste Bourguignon (1697-1782) - Thomas JEFFERYS (1719-71)

North America From the French of Mr. D'Anville Improved with the Back Settlements of Virginia and Course of Ohio Illustrated with Geographical and Historical Remarks

London: Printed for Robt. Sayer ... and Thos. Jefferys ..., [1768]. Engraved map. Text in three columns below the cartouche, headed "English Title to their Settlements on the Continent." Two columns of text in the upper left corner, headed "French Encroachments". Sheet size: 21 5/8 x 28 inches.

Rare issue of this important map of North America published following the French and Indian War.

Stevens and Tree's second state, with the Sayer and Jefferys imprint, and the addition of two lines at the end of the third column of text, reading: "The Boundaries of the Provinces since the Conquest of Canada are laid down in this Map as settled by the King in Council."

The text in the upper left corner provides a chronology of French depredations in the region from the end of the 17th century; likewise, the text in the lower right corner provides a chronology to validate the British claims, beginning with Cabot in 1497. The map was first published in 1755, and would appear in that state in Jefferys' Natural and Civil History of the French Dominions. As the additional note to this scarce second issue suggests, the map is important in its depiction of the boundaries following the war, shown by means of hachured lines. The map would be re-issued, with various changes to the plate, into the 19th century.

Stevens and Tree "Comparative Cartography" 51b, in Tooley, The Mapping of America; McCorkle, New England in Early Printed Maps 755.2; Sellers and Van Ee, Maps and Charts of North America and the West Indies 29; Phillips, A List of Maps of America, p. 576.

#25606$2,800.00
 
 
D'ANVILLE, Jean Baptiste Bourguignon (1697-1782) - Thomas JEFFERYS (1719-71)

North America From the French of Mr. D'Anville Improved with the Back Settlements of Virginia and Course of Ohio Illustrated with Geographical and Historical Remarks

London: Thomas Jefferys, [1755]. Engraved map, period hand-colouring in outline. Text in three columns below the cartouche, headed "English Title to their Settlements on the Continent." Two columns of text in the upper left corner, headed "French Encroachments." Provenance: Judge C. C. Baldwin (manuscript inscription in the lower margin dated 1894).

First issue of this important map published during the French and Indian War.

Stevens and Tree's first state, with the Jefferys imprint, and without the addition of two lines at the end of the third column of text, reading: "The Boundaries of the Provinces since the Conquest of Canada are laid down in this Map as settled by the King in Council."

The text in the upper left corner provides a chronology of French depredations in the region from the end of the 17th century; likewise, the text in the lower right corner provides a chronology to validate the British claims, beginning with Cabot in 1497. The map was first published in 1755 and would be re-issued, with various changes to the plate, into the 19th century.

Stevens and Tree "Comparative Cartography" 51a, in Tooley, The Mapping of America; McCorkle, New England in Early Printed Maps 755.2; Sellers and Van Ee, Maps and Charts of North America and the West Indies 29; Phillips, A List of Maps of America, p. 576.

#25616$3,500.00
 
 
D'ANVILLE, Jean Baptiste Bourguignon (1697-1782)

Africa, with All Its States, Kingdomes, Republics, Regions, Island &c. Improved and inlarged from D'Anville's map to which have been added a particular chart of the Gold Coast [on an inset larger scale map] wherein are distinguished all the european forts and factories by S. Boulton and also a summary description relative to the trade and natural produce, manners and customs of the African continent and islands

London: Robert Laurie & James Whittle, 1794. Copper-engraved map, on four joined sheets, with original outline colour, some splits to old folds, small tears at margins, one with slight loss, overall in good condition. Sheet size: 41 1/2 x 49 1/4 inches.

A fascinating late eighteenth-century wall map of Africa, after one of France's greatest cartographers

Jean Baptiste Bourguignon d'Anville was the spiritual successor to Guillaume De L'Isle in the sense that he maintained the rigorous standard for accuracy that De L'Isle had established. D'Anville was the last French mapmaker to establish an international reputation superior to all his contemporaries, as witnessed by the respect shown by English cartographers and publishers during an era when the two countries were often at war and always hostile to one another.

This excellent map of Africa, an English edition with revisions of D'Anville by Laurie & Whittle, was issued when the European appetite for exploration and colonization of the continent was just getting underway. By this time there were well over fifty fort/trading posts on the western and southeastern coasts representing various European nations, but there had been almost no penetration of the interior (these European `forts & factories' on the Gold Coast are shown in close up on Boulton's inset map). With the gradual outlawing of the slave trade by most civilized nations, interest in the vast interior regions greatly increased as whites sought other profitable resources, and Catholic and Protestant missionaries bravely evangelised.

The peoples of Africa proved much more diverse and intriguing than ever imagined, and some of the discoveries in this regard are included in the extensive texts that are interspersed amongst the geographic features shown on the map.


#10394$2,500.00
 
 
D'ANVILLE, Jean Baptiste Bourguignon (1697-1782)

North America from the French of Mr. d'Anville improved with the British Surveys made Since the Peace

London: Sayer & Bennett, June 1775. Copper engraved map with original outline colour. Repaired tears and creases in the upper margin, otherwise excellent. Sheet size: 21 x 28 1/2 inches.

A fine of copy this attractive map of North America

Jean Baptiste Bourguignon d'Anville was the successor to Guillaume De l'Isle in the sense that he maintained the rigorous standard for accuracy that De l'Isle had established. D'Anville was the last French mapmaker to establish an international reputation which was superior to all his contemporaries, as witnessed by the respect shown by English cartographers and publishers during an era when the two countries were often at war and always hostile to one another.

This D'Anville map was first appropriated by Thomas Jefferys in 1755, who used it to demonstrate French provocations that would lead imminently to war. In 1775, Sayer & Bennett revised Jefferys' map to show British colonial America as understood when the Revolution broke out.. The Peace referred to in the title refers to the 1763 peace accord with France.

The map is wonderfully detailed and informative giving accurately the locales of Indian tribes just west of the white colonies, particularly in the southeast.

Stevens & Tree 51 (c); McCorkle 775.2

#19739$1,750.00
 
 
D'ANVILLE, Jean Baptiste Bourguignon (1697-1782)

Amerique Septentrionale

Paris: 1746. Copper engraved map, on four unjoined sheets, period hand-colouring in outline. Sheet size: Approximately 41 x 36 inches, if joined.

One of the best French Maps of North America prior to the French & Indian War.

"To illustrate the cartography of the second half of the eighteenth century, a d'Anville map is essential. He dominated not only French but all contemporary geographers. He was one of the foremost to leave blank spaces in his maps where knowledge was insufficient" (Tooley).

Jean Baptiste Bouguignon d'Anville was appointed Royal Geographer to Louis XV at the age of twenty. A meticulous scholar of cartographic sources, he drew on more than fifty years of French exploration of the region to draft this map. Cavalier de La Salle was the first explorer to travel down the Mississippi to the Gulf in 1682, claiming the region for France. The Sieur d'Iberville founded New Orleans in 1717, and by the time this map was drafted, the French had heavily explored the region. As shown here, they had at various times established a series of forts at Natchez, Mobile, Biloxi, and various missions in the upper Mississippi valley. The Spanish settlement of Pensacola as well as numerous native villages are also depicted. As evinced here, the French had not only surveyed the Gulf coast but also the interior, as the courses of many rivers, such as the Red, Ouachita, Pearl, Pascagoula, and Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, and Missouri Rivers are clearly delineated. Also of note on this map is an excellent depiction of the Great Lakes (considered cartographically superior to the mapping by Mitchell) and the Ohio River Valley, as well as the inclusion of the newly formed colony of Georgia.

"Jean-Baptiste Bourguignon d'Anville engraved his first map at age fifteen. He carried on the French school of cartography developed by the Sanson and the Delisle families and enjoyed a reputation as the finest mapmaker of his time. Although he apparently never left the city of Paris, he had access to the reports and maps of French explorers, traders, and missionaries. D'Anvilles American maps draw on material gathered from several French expeditions made during the first half of the eighteenth century. At this time, the French were intent on preempting Spanish expansion into the Mississippi River valley and finding trade routes to the western Indians and Santa Fe. DAnvilles maps significantly improved the geographic knowledge of the Mississippi and Missouri river regions" (Lewis & Clark: the Maps of Exploration, University of Virginia Library, online exhibition).

This map would have a lasting impact with Thomas Jeffery's using it as the basis for his own map of North America in 1755. Furthermore, d'Anville's 1746 map was among the maps consulted by Nicholas King for his seminal manuscript map of the western parts of North America done for use on the Lewis & Clark expedition.

Phillips, A List of Maps of America, p. 571; Tooley, pp. 316-371; Lowery 381; The Literature of the Lewis & Clark Expedition, p. 40; Karpinski, Bibliography of the Printed Maps of Michigan p. 138.

#25792$3,000.00
 
 
DAKOTA - SMITH, B. M.; and A. J. HILL.

Map of the ceded part of Dakota Territory: showing also portions of Minnesota, Iowa & Nebraska ... Second edition, July 1863 ...

St. Paul, Minnesota: B.M. Smith and A. J. Hill, 1863. Pocket map, lithographed by Louis Buechner, St. Paul. Inset map titled "Outline Map of Dakota Territory." Folds into publisher's green cloth covers, covers decoratively blocked in blind, titled in gilt on the upper cover, publisher's printed prospectus on the front pastedown. In fine condition. Sheet size: 17 1/2 x 22 1/2 inches.

One of the earliest maps of Dakota Territory and a Sioux Uprising rarity.

The map clearly shows all of the roads, railroads, forts, towns, rivers and Indian lands in the region, as well as the exploration routes of Nicollet and others in the new Dakota Territory. The prospectus mounted on the inside cover reveals the intention of the compiler: "This map is issued in the hope that it may be found a valuable travelling companion for immigrants, U.S. deputy surveyors, military officers, and others. It is compiled from the U.S. Land and other official surveys, and where those have not yet extended, from information derivable from the reports and maps of Mons. Nicollet, Lieut Warren, and other explorers..."

"This [second] edition gives several new counties along the eastern boundary of the Territory, both in the inset and on the main map, and there are various new counties in the southern part of the Territory. The inset in this issue shows the creation of Idaho Territory to the west of Dakota" (Streeter). Perhaps more importantly, however, this edition of the map is important for the additions relating to the Sioux War. These include the locations of the Battles of Birch Coulee and Wood Lake (each marked with small red x's), as well as the location of Camp Release (dated on the map October 1862) and the spot near Kampeska Lake where Colonel William R. Marshall of the 7th Minnesota captured a force of Sioux warriors.

We find no copy of this map on the market since the Thomas W. Streeter copy.

Streeter sale 2034; Graff 3835; Phillips, A List of Maps of America, p. 257

#24804$9,500.00
 
 
DALRYMPLE, Alexander (1737-1808)

An Historical Collection of the Several Voyages and Discoveries in the South Pacific Ocean

London: Printed for the author, and sold by J. Nourse and T. Payne, 1770 [-1771]. 2 volumes in one, quarto (10 1/4 x 7 7/8 inches). xxx, [2], 32, 24, 204, [4]; [4], 224, 20, [12], [40] pp. Half-titles, first with advertisement on verso. Volume one title and dedication as cancels. 16 engraved maps and plates (4 folding maps, 12 plates [6 folding]). Contemporary sprinkled calf, expertly rebacked retaining the original spine, flat spine divided into six compartments, red and black morocco labels in the second and fourth, the others with a repeat decoration in gilt. Provenance: Sir Gilbert Elliot, 3rd Baronet and Lord Minto (1722-1777, treasurer of the Navy, armorial shelf label).

A rare, early work arguing for the existence of a great Southern Continent and reviewing the early Spanish and Dutch exploration of the South Pacific, illustrated with fine maps and plates.

"This important work, issued before the return of Captain Cook's expedition, is the result of Dalrymple's strong belief in the existence of a southern continent" (Hill). In it, the author translates and reviews twelve foreign accounts of voyages which he believed supported its existence, including the Spanish voyages of Magellan, Mendana's voyage to the Solomon Islands in 1595, and that of De Quiros in 1606. The second volume comprises the Dutch accounts including those of Le Maire, Schouten, Tasman, and Roggeveen. All are preceded by a valuable introduction, a section explaining the sources for his Chart of the South Sea, as well as chapters on the Solomon Islands, including a comparative vocabulary, and the "natural curiosities at Sooloo."

Although Dalrymple's thesis on the existence of a southern continent would be disproved by Cook, Hill refers to Dalrymple as a cartographer "without peer" and as "a latter-day Hakluyt." Dalrymple made his career as a hydrographer to the East India Company. Originally offered the command of the Endeavour voyage to observe the transit of Venus, the command would be given instead to Cook, partly because of Dalrymple's insistence on being given an Admiralty commission. His disappointment and anger at the Admiralty is brought forth in the remarkable "dedication" of this work, in which he critiques previous British explorers of the region. Dalrymple would be elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1771 and would later become the Hydrographer to the Board of Admiralty. In that capacity, Dalrymple would be responsible for preparing for publication the maps from the expeditions of Vancouver, Colnett and others.

Two issues of the work were published. "[The] first issue of 1769 is exceedingly rare, and there are only a few copies extant. The regular trade edition was issued in 1770 [as the present copy]. The second volume, printed in 1771, is exactly the same in both sets. However the two issues of the first volume have different title pages and preliminary materials" (Hill). Among the changes to the dedication are variant dates (April 1, 1769; Jan. 1, 1769), along with amended text to the attack on Captain Samuel Wallis ("who left the arms of a calypso"; "who, infatuated with female blandishments, forgot for what he went abroad"). In the latter issue, both the title and dedication are present as cancels.

Davidson, A Book Collector's Notes, pp. 36-7; Hill 410; Holmes (first issue) 32; Kroepelien 245; Spence 264.

#24593$16,000.00
 
 
DAMAME-DÉMARTRAIS, Michel François (1763-1828)

Paris et ses alentours, à plus de trente lieues à la ronde; ouvrage national de gravures

Paris: Firmin Didot, 1818. Large folio (28 3/4 x 21 inches). Letterpress title (verso blank), 1p. dedication to Louis XVIII (verso blank), 1p. 'avant-propos' (verso blank), 30ll. explanatory text (all but two printed recto only, one leaf preceding each plate). 30 fine uncoloured aquatint plates by and after Damame-Démartrais. (The 12th plate, a view of Notre-Dame, with a repaired tear in the outer margin). Contemporary blue/green straight-grained morocco-backed paper-covered boards, the flat spine divided into six compartments by double gilt fillets, lettered in the second compartment, old repairs to spine.

A beautiful and rare large-scale work of views of Paris and its environs.

According to Dulau's 1828 catalogue this work was originally sold in parts. They offered the present uncoloured issue at £20 (item 12456), whilst the issue with the plates printed in colours and finished by hand (item 12457) was on sale at £40. An idea of the book's current rarity can be garnered from the fact that OCLC list only a single copy: that in the Victoria & Albert Museum's "National Art Library" in London, and even the distinguished Bobins collection contains only a fragmentary work (with 5 plates in two states).

Damame-Démartrais is now best known for his Collection complete des divers jardins et points de vue des maisons de plaisance imperiales de Russie.... [Paris, 1811]: a result of the nine years he spent living in Moscow and St.Petersburg between 1796 and 1805. Paris born, Damame-Démartrais was apparently taught by David but is now celebrated for his drawings and aquatints. The present work, dedicated to King Louis XVIII, was prompted by the artist's wish to record the new open vistas in Paris and its environs: each of the beautiful large-scale plates is accompanied by brief text which gives relevant details of the subject. The artist also notes in the 'avant-propos' that this work fills a gap, as there were no other comparable books of views of Paris and its environs. The majority of the plates are of places in Paris, but, as the title suggests, there are also a significant minority of the views of beautiful locations outside the city.

Cf. Bobins The Exotic and the Beautiful II, 516; A Catalogue of the Library of the Athenæum (1845) p.85; A. Dulau & Co. Catalogue of Books in Foreign Languages , A. Dulau & Co. (1828) p.600; F. E. Joubert, père. Manuel de l'Amateur d'Estampes (1821) p.386; Le Blanc Manuel (1856) II, p.84.

#20858$37,500.00
 
 
DANA, Charles Anderson (1819-1897, editor)

The United States Illustrated; in views of city and country. With descriptive and historical articles...

New York: Herrmann J. Meyer, [1855]. 2 volumes, quarto (11 5/8 x 9 inches). Steel-engraved additional titles, 80 steel-engraved plates. (Occasional spotting to plates). Contemporary red half calf over morocco-grained red cloth-covered boards, spines in six compartments with raised bands, black morocco lettering-piece in the second compartment, lettered direct in gilt in the fourth, the others with elaborate repeat decoration in gilt, marbled endpapers, marbled edges.

A fine set of this important American steel-engraved view book.

The original intention had been to issue this work in many volumes divided geographically into east and west with subscribers given the option to select only one region. The additional titles ("East vol.I" and "West vol.I") bear testimony to the intention; but only the present two volumes were ever published.

The work as a whole was edited by Dana but the individual articles were written by a series of writers: Parke Godwin, H. Greeley, E.C. Sprague, W.H. Fry, Edmund Flagg, J.M. Peck, Dana himself and a number of others. The plates are the work's chief attraction, and are very fine examples of their type, equal to the work that was being produced in Europe at the time. The East volume includes views of Niagara, Washington, West Point, Mount Vernon, New York, and Harper's Ferry; the West is represented by scenes in Minnesota, along the Mississippi, in Missouri, St. Louis, on the Plains, California (including San Francisco, Sacramento, California gold diggings), New Orleans, Fort Snelling, Nauvoo, New Harmony, St. Louis, Kansas, Jefferson City, Independence, Mandan Village, and others. Although Howes calls for seventy-seven plates, this copy contains the full complement of eighty.

Flake 2657; Howes D45 "aa"; Sabin 18396.

#22756$3,500.00
 
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