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BODMER, Karl (1809-1893)

Sih-Chidä & Mahchsi-Karehde. Mandan Indians [Tab. 20]

[Tab. 20]. Paris, Coblenz and London: [1839-1842]. Hand-coloured aquatint engraving by Hürlimann after Bodmer, blindstamp. Plate mark: 19 3/4 x 16 3/8 inches. Sheet size: 24 7/8 x 17 7/8 inches. Brid's-eye maple, gold liner. 35 x 27 1/2 inches.

A fine full-length double portrait by Bodmer, composed from sketches made during the winter of 1833-1834 during the travelers sojourn at Fort Clark, on the banks of the upper Missouri River. On the left stands Sih-Chidä (`Yellow Feather') a young warrior who was fascinated by the work of the two foreigners. His portrait was carried out over three days in early December 1833. In it, he wears the beaded hair brows with long strings of dentalium shells and beads, a member of the Dog Society, the cluster of feathers at the back of his head may be an insignia of that group. Around his neck is draped a tippet of otter fur, the ends fringed with quill-wrapped leather. His heel-trailers are made of otter fur lined with red cloth and represent battle exploits. On the right is Mahchsi-Karehde (`Flying War Eagle'), who at just over six feet was the tallest of the Mandan. He also showed much interest in Bodmer's work, and over the winter was a frequent visitor, often bringing friends to look at Bodmer's drawings. He was a member of band of warriors that regulated the important affairs of the tribe. The wolf tail on his heels and painted eagle feather in his hair denote battle coup. His rich clothing and general demeanor all denote a proud and successful man.

Karl Bodmer's images show great versatility and technical virtuosity and give us a uniquely accomplished and detailed picture of a previously little understood (and soon to vanish) way of life. Swiss-born Bodmer was engaged by Prince Maximilian zu Wied-Neuwied (1782-1867) specifically to provide a record of his travels in North America, principally among the Plains Indians. In the company of David Dreidoppel (Prince Maximilian's servant and hunting companion), their travels in North America were to last from 1832 to 1834. Well-armed with information and advice, the party finally left St.Louis, on the most important stage of their travels, aboard the steamer Yellow Stone on April 10 1833. They proceeded up the treacherous Missouri River along the line of forts established by the American Fur Company. At Bellevue they encountered their first Indians, then went on to make contact with the Sioux tribe, learning of and recording their little known ceremonial dances and powerful pride and dignity. Transferring from the Yellow Stone to another steamer, the Assiniboin, they continued to Fort Clark, visiting there the Mandan, Mintari and Crow tribes, then the Assiniboins at Fort Union, the main base of the American Fur Company. On a necessarily much smaller vessel they journeyed through the extraordinary geological scenery of that section of the Missouri to Fort Mackenzie in Montana, establishing a cautious friendship with the fearsome Blackfeet. From this, the westernmost point reached, it was considered too dangerous to continue and the return journey downstream began. The winter brought its own difficulties and discomforts, but Bodmer was still able to execute numerous studies of villages, dances and especially the people, who were often both intrigued and delighted by his work. The portraits are particularly notable for their capturing of individual personalities, as well as forming a primary account of what were to become virtually lost cultures.

Graff 4648; Howes M443a; Pilling 2521; Sabin 47014; Wagner-Camp 76:1.

#4255$5,000.00
 
 
BODMER, Karl (1809-1893)

Sih-Chidä & Mahchsi-Karehde. Mandan Indians [Tab. 20]

[Tab. 20]. Paris, Coblenz and London: 1841. Aquatint engraving by Hürlimann after Bodmer, state with date added to London imprint 'April 1th [sic.] 1841'. Sheet size: 24 1/2 x 17 inches.

A fine full-length double portrait by Bodmer, composed from sketches made during the winter of 1833-1834 during the travelers sojourn at Fort Clark, on the banks of the upper Missouri River. On the left stands Sih-Chidä (`Yellow Feather') a young warrior who was fascinated by the work of the two foreigners. His portrait was carried out over three days in early December 1833. In it, he wears the beaded hair brows with long strings of dentalium shells and beads, a member of the Dog Society, the cluster of feathers at the back of his head may be an insignia of that group. Around his neck is draped a tippet of otter fur, the ends fringed with quill-wrapped leather. His heel-trailers are made of otter fur lined with red cloth and represent battle exploits. On the right is Mahchsi-Karehde (`Flying War Eagle'), who at just over six feet was the tallest of the Mandan. He also showed much interest in Bodmer's work, and over the winter was a frequent visitor, often bringing friends to look at Bodmer's drawings. He was a member of band of warriors that regulated the important affairs of the tribe. The wolf tail on his heels and painted eagle feather in his hair denote battle coup. His rich clothing and general demeanor all denote a proud and successful man.

Karl Bodmer's images show great versatility and technical virtuosity and give us a uniquely accomplished and detailed picture of a previously little understood (and soon to vanish) way of life. Swiss-born Bodmer was engaged by Prince Maximilian zu Wied-Neuwied (1782-1867) specifically to provide a record of his travels in North America, principally among the Plains Indians. In the company of David Dreidoppel (Prince Maximilian's servant and hunting companion), their travels in North America were to last from 1832 to 1834. Well-armed with information and advice, the party finally left St.Louis, on the most important stage of their travels, aboard the steamer Yellow Stone on April 10 1833. They proceeded up the treacherous Missouri River along the line of forts established by the American Fur Company. At Bellevue they encountered their first Indians, then went on to make contact with the Sioux tribe, learning of and recording their little known ceremonial dances and powerful pride and dignity. Transferring from the Yellow Stone to another steamer, the Assiniboin, they continued to Fort Clark, visiting there the Mandan, Mintari and Crow tribes, then the Assiniboins at Fort Union, the main base of the American Fur Company. On a necessarily much smaller vessel they journeyed through the extraordinary geological scenery of that section of the Missouri to Fort Mackenzie in Montana, establishing a cautious friendship with the fearsome Blackfeet. From this, the westernmost point reached, it was considered too dangerous to continue and the return journey downstream began. The winter brought its own difficulties and discomforts, but Bodmer was still able to execute numerous studies of villages, dances and especially the people, who were often both intrigued and delighted by his work. The portraits are particularly notable for their capturing of individual personalities, as well as forming a primary account of what were to become virtually lost cultures.

Graff 4648; Howes M443a; Pilling 2521; Sabin 47014; Wagner-Camp 76:1.

#15553$3,500.00
 
 
BODMER, Karl (1809-1893)

Snags (sunken trees) on the Missouri [Tab. 6]

[Tab. 6]. Paris, Coblenz and London: [1839-1842]. Hand-coloured aquatint engraving by L. Weber and Hurlimann after Bodmer, blindstamp. Plate mark: 14 1/4 x 17 inches. Sheet size: 17 7/8 x 24 5/16 inches.

An almost apocalyptic view of the treacherous waters of the Missouri River. The river was the longest in the country and was considered the most hazardous of all the western rivers to navigate. Edging their way between the rafts of driftwood became increasingly difficult for the travelers aboard the steamer Yellow Stone, as she made her way up river toward the mouth of the River Platte. On 26 April 1833 she passed the mouth of the Nemaha River and again encountered snags and sandbars. In his journal for that date Maximilian noted that `For a long time we could not get away from this and often ran agroundů but finally with a little force of the engine we moved on'.

Karl Bodmer's images show great versatility and technical virtuosity and give us a uniquely accomplished and detailed picture of a previously little understood (and soon to vanish) way of life. Swiss-born Bodmer was engaged by Prince Maximilian zu Wied-Neuwied (1782-1867) specifically to provide a record of his travels in North America, principally among the Plains Indians. In the company of David Dreidoppel (Prince Maximilian's servant and hunting companion), their travels in North America were to last from 1832 to 1834. Well-armed with information and advice, the party finally left St.Louis, on the most important stage of their travels, aboard the steamer Yellow Stone on April 10 1833. They proceeded up the treacherous Missouri River along the line of forts established by the American Fur Company. At Bellevue they encountered their first Indians, then went on to make contact with the Sioux tribe, learning of and recording their little known ceremonial dances and powerful pride and dignity. Transferring from the Yellow Stone to another steamer, the Assiniboin, they continued to Fort Clark, visiting there the Mandan, Mintari and Crow tribes, then the Assiniboins at Fort Union, the main base of the American Fur Company. On a necessarily much smaller vessel they journeyed through the extraordinary geological scenery of that section of the Missouri to Fort Mackenzie in Montana, establishing a cautious friendship with the fearsome Blackfeet. From this, the westernmost point reached, it was considered too dangerous to continue and the return journey downstream began. The winter brought its own difficulties and discomforts, but Bodmer was still able to execute numerous studies of villages, dances and especially the people, who were often both intrigued and delighted by his work. The portraits are particularly notable for their capturing of individual personalities, as well as forming a primary account of what were to become virtually lost cultures.

Graff 4648; Howes M443a; Pilling 2521; Sabin 47014; Wagner-Camp 76:1.

#4773$2,000.00
 
 
BODMER, Karl (1809-1893)

Snags (sunken trees) on the Missouri [Tab. 6]

[Tab. 6]. Paris, Coblentz and London: 1839-1842. Aquatint engraving by L. Weber and Hurlimann after Bodmer, proof on india paper mounted, blindstamp. India paper lifting slightly, small marginal tears to mount not affecting image area, light marginal dampstaining. Plate mark: 14 3/16 x 17 1/8 inches. Sheet size: 18 1/2 x 24 3/4 inches.

A rare Inia proof of this almost apocalyptic view of the treacherous waters of the Missouri River. The river was the longest in the country and was considered the most hazardous of all the western rivers to navigate. Edging their way between the rafts of driftwood became increasingly difficult for the travelers aboard the steamer Yellow Stone, as she made her way up river toward the mouth of the River Platte. On 26 April 1833 she passed the mouth of the Nemaha River and again encountered snags and sandbars. In his journal for that date Maximilian noted that `For a long time we could not get away from this and often ran agroundů but finally with a little force of the engine we moved on'.

Karl Bodmer's images show great versatility and technical virtuosity and give us a uniquely accomplished and detailed picture of a previously little understood (and soon to vanish) way of life. Swiss-born Bodmer was engaged by Prince Maximilian zu Wied-Neuwied (1782-1867) specifically to provide a record of his travels in North America, principally among the Plains Indians. In the company of David Dreidoppel (Prince Maximilian's servant and hunting companion), their travels in North America were to last from 1832 to 1834. Well-armed with information and advice, the party finally left St.Louis, on the most important stage of their travels, aboard the steamer Yellow Stone on April 10 1833. They proceeded up the treacherous Missouri River along the line of forts established by the American Fur Company. At Bellevue they encountered their first Indians, then went on to make contact with the Sioux tribe, learning of and recording their little known ceremonial dances and powerful pride and dignity. Transferring from the Yellow Stone to another steamer, the Assiniboin, they continued to Fort Clark, visiting there the Mandan, Mintari and Crow tribes, then the Assiniboins at Fort Union, the main base of the American Fur Company. On a necessarily much smaller vessel they journeyed through the extraordinary geological scenery of that section of the Missouri to Fort Mackenzie in Montana, establishing a cautious friendship with the fearsome Blackfeet. From this, the westernmost point reached, it was considered too dangerous to continue and the return journey downstream began. The winter brought its own difficulties and discomforts, but Bodmer was still able to execute numerous studies of villages, dances and especially the people, who were often both intrigued and delighted by his work. The portraits are particularly notable for their capturing of individual personalities, as well as forming a primary account of what was to become virtually lost cultures.

Graff 4648; Howes M443a; Pilling 2521; Sabin 47014; Wagner-Camp 76:1.

#15620$1,500.00
 
 
BODMER, Karl (1809-1893)

The Citadel-Rock on the upper Missouri [Vig. 18]

[Vig. 18]. [Leipzig: Schmidt and Guenther, 1922]. Hand-coloured aquatint engraving by L. Weber after Bodmer, issue with no imprint line. Plate mark: 9 x 12 1/4 inches. Sheet size: 12 3/4 x 16 inches.

The Weber version of this image from the scarce Leipzig edition printed from the original copper-plates. Limited in number, the prints from the Leipzig edition are more scarce than, and compare favorably to, the first edition. (David C. Hunt, "Karl Bodmer and the American Frontier," Imprint/Spring 85, p.18)

This title was printed from two separate plates: one by Vogel with heavy use of aquatint in the water and the birds shown only flying low over its surface, and a second by Weber with little use of aquatint in the water and birds low over the water but also high in the sky. A highly evocative image by Bodmer of the state monument now known as Cathedral Rock. He pictures the towering rock at sunset, a reddish-tinge fills the landscape and a skein of geese come in to land on the river, on their way to their night's roosting place. This prominent landmark was recorded by Lewis and Clark but not named by them, it later became known as La Citadelle or Citadel Rock. This image was captured on 6 August 1833 as the party continued up the Missouri aboard the keelboat Flora.

Karl Bodmer's images show great versatility and technical virtuosity and give us a uniquely accomplished and detailed picture of a previously little understood (and soon to vanish) way of life. Swiss-born Bodmer was engaged by Prince Maximilian zu Wied-Neuwied (1782-1867) specifically to provide a record of his travels in North America, principally among the Plains Indians. In the company of David Dreidoppel (Prince Maximilian's servant and hunting companion), their travels in North America were to last from 1832 to 1834. Well-armed with information and advice, the party finally left St.Louis, on the most important stage of their travels, aboard the steamer Yellow Stone on April 10 1833. They proceeded up the treacherous Missouri River along the line of forts established by the American Fur Company. At Bellevue they encountered their first Indians, then went on to make contact with the Sioux tribe, learning of and recording their little known ceremonial dances and powerful pride and dignity. Transferring from the Yellow Stone to another steamer, the Assiniboin, they continued to Fort Clark, visiting there the Mandan, Mintari and Crow tribes, then the Assiniboins at Fort Union, the main base of the American Fur Company. On a necessarily much smaller vessel they journeyed through the extraordinary geological scenery of that section of the Missouri to Fort Mackenzie in Montana, establishing a cautious friendship with the fearsome Blackfeet. From this, the westernmost point reached, it was considered too dangerous to continue and the return journey downstream began. The winter brought its own difficulties and discomforts, but Bodmer was still able to execute numerous studies of villages, dances and especially the people, who were often both intrigued and delighted by his work. The portraits are particularly notable for their capturing of individual personalities, as well as forming a primary account of what were to become virtually lost cultures.

`David C. Hunt, "Karl Bodmer and the American Frontier," Imprint/Spring 1985, p.18.

Cf.Graff 4648; cf. Howes M443a; cf. Pilling 2521; cf. Sabin 47014; cf. Wagner-Camp 76:1.

#15617$300.00
 
 
BODMER, Karl (1809-1893)

The Elkhorn Pyramid on the Upper Missouri [Vig. 21]

[Vig. 21]. Paris, Coblenz and London: [1839-42]. Hand-coloured aquatint engraving by Fournier after Bodmer, blindstamp. Plate mark: 10 3/16 x 13 1/2 inches. Sheet size: 12 1/4 x 18 inches.

In July 1833, between Forts Union and McKenzie, the keelboat Flora stopped to allow Maximilian and his party to examine a remarkable cairn of elk antlers on the prairie, just inland from the Missouri River. The ground in all directions was littered with the antlers cast during the bulls' annual shedding. Each Blackfoot hunting party had collected antlers as they passed, adding them to the growing pile, and sometimes marking them with red paint to indicate the number in the party. Intended as a charm to ensure a successful hunt, by the time it was sketched by Bodmer it was over fifteen feet high and contained over a thousand antlers.

Karl Bodmer's images show great versatility and technical virtuosity and give us a uniquely accomplished and detailed picture of a previously little understood (and soon to vanish) way of life. Swiss-born Bodmer was engaged by Prince Maximilian zu Wied-Neuwied (1782-1867) specifically to provide a record of his travels in North America, principally among the Plains Indians. In the company of David Dreidoppel (Prince Maximilian's servant and hunting companion), their travels in North America were to last from 1832 to 1834. Well-armed with information and advice, the party finally left St.Louis, on the most important stage of their travels, aboard the steamer Yellow Stone on April 10 1833. They proceeded up the treacherous Missouri River along the line of forts established by the American Fur Company. At Bellevue they encountered their first Indians, then went on to make contact with the Sioux tribe, learning of and recording their little known ceremonial dances and powerful pride and dignity. Transferring from the Yellow Stone to another steamer, the Assiniboin, they continued to Fort Clark, visiting there the Mandan, Mintari and Crow tribes, then the Assiniboins at Fort Union, the main base of the American Fur Company. On a necessarily much smaller vessel they journeyed through the extraordinary geological scenery of that section of the Missouri to Fort Mackenzie in Montana, establishing a cautious friendship with the fearsome Blackfeet. From this, the westernmost point reached, it was considered too dangerous to continue and the return journey downstream began. The winter brought its own difficulties and discomforts, but Bodmer was still able to execute numerous studies of villages, dances and especially the people, who were often both intrigued and delighted by his work. The portraits are particularly notable for their capturing of individual personalities, as well as forming a primary account of what were to become virtually lost cultures.

Graff 4648; Howes M443a; Pilling 2521; Sabin 47014; Wagner-Camp 76:1.

#4187$700.00
 
 
BODMER, Karl (1809-1893)

The Elkhorn Pyramid on the Upper Missouri [Vig. 21]

[Vig. 21]. [Leipzig: Schmidt and Guenther, 1922]. Hand-coloured aquatint engraving by A. Fournier after Bodmer, issue without imprint line. Plate mark: 10 x 13 1/4 inches. Sheet size: 12 3/4 x 16 inches.

From the scarce Leipzig edition printed from the original copper-plates. Limited in number, the prints from the Leipzig edition are more scarce than, and compare favorably to, the first edition. (David C. Hunt, "Karl Bodmer and the American Frontier," Imprint/Spring 85, p.1

A rare India proof. In July 1833, between Forts Union and McKenzie, the keelboat Flora stopped to allow Maximilian and his party to examine a remarkable cairn of elk antlers on the prairie, just inland from the Missouri River. The ground in all directions was littered with the antlers cast during the bulls' annual shedding. Each Blackfoot hunting party had collected antlers as they passed, adding them to the growing pile, and sometimes marking them with red paint to indicate the number in the party. Intended as a charm to ensure a successful hunt, by the time it was sketched by Bodmer it was over fifteen feet high and contained over a thousand antlers.

Karl Bodmer's images show great versatility and technical virtuosity and give us a uniquely accomplished and detailed picture of a previously little understood (and soon to vanish) way of life. Swiss-born Bodmer was engaged by Prince Maximilian zu Wied-Neuwied (1782-1867) specifically to provide a record of his travels in North America, principally among the Plains Indians. In the company of David Dreidoppel (Prince Maximilian's servant and hunting companion), their travels in North America were to last from 1832 to 1834. Well-armed with information and advice, the party finally left St.Louis, on the most important stage of their travels, aboard the steamer Yellow Stone on April 10 1833. They proceeded up the treacherous Missouri River along the line of forts established by the American Fur Company. At Bellevue they encountered their first Indians, then went on to make contact with the Sioux tribe, learning of and recording their little known ceremonial dances and powerful pride and dignity. Transferring from the Yellow Stone to another steamer, the Assiniboin, they continued to Fort Clark, visiting there the Mandan, Mintari and Crow tribes, then the Assiniboins at Fort Union, the main base of the American Fur Company. On a necessarily much smaller vessel they journeyed through the extraordinary geological scenery of that section of the Missouri to Fort Mackenzie in Montana, establishing a cautious friendship with the fearsome Blackfeet. From this, the westernmost point reached, it was considered too dangerous to continue and the return journey downstream began. The winter brought its own difficulties and discomforts, but Bodmer was still able to execute numerous studies of villages, dances and especially the people, who were often both intrigued and delighted by his work. The portraits are particularly notable for their capturing of individual personalities, as well as forming a primary account of what were to become virtually lost cultures.

`David C. Hunt, "Karl Bodmer and the American Frontier," Imprint/Spring 1985, p.18.

Cf.Graff 4648; cf. Howes M443a; cf. Pilling 2521; cf. Sabin 47014; cf. Wagner-Camp 76:1.

#15643$300.00
 
 
BODMER, Karl (1809-1893)

The Steamer Yellow-Stone on the 19th April 1833 [Tab. 4]

[Tab. 4]. [Leipzig: Schmidt and Guenther, 1922]. Aquatint engraving Lucas Weber after Bodmer. Small marginal tears not affecting plate area. Plate mark: 13 5/8 x 17 inches. Sheet size: 18 3/4 x 25 1/2 inches.

From the scarce Leipzig edition printed from the original copper-plates. Limited in number, the prints from the Leipzig edition are more scarce than, and compare favorably to, the first edition. (David C. Hunt, "Karl Bodmer and the American Frontier," Imprint/Spring 85, p.18)

A fine view of the side-wheeler in the then treacherous waters of the Missouri River: the longest river in the country, it was considered by far the most difficult of all western rivers to navigate. The steamer Yellow Stone had run aground on a sandbank on the evening of the 18th and remained there overnight. The following morning a flatboat from Fort Osage, located some three and half miles upstream, had arrived to unload part of the cargo and lighten its draft. Prince Maximilian recorded in his journal that `Mr. Bodmer had made from shore this morning a pretty sketch of the ship as it was unloaded, but the wind was unpleasant and stirred up so much sand that he could not paint'.

Karl Bodmer's images show great versatility and technical virtuosity and give us a uniquely accomplished and detailed picture of a previously little understood (and soon to vanish) way of life. Swiss-born Bodmer was engaged by Prince Maximilian zu Wied-Neuwied (1782-1867) specifically to provide a record of his travels in North America, principally among the Plains Indians. In the company of David Dreidoppel (Prince Maximilian's servant and hunting companion), their travels in North America were to last from 1832 to 1834. Well-armed with information and advice, the party finally left St.Louis, on the most important stage of their travels, aboard the steamer Yellow Stone on April 10 1833. They proceeded up the treacherous Missouri River along the line of forts established by the American Fur Company. At Bellevue they encountered their first Indians, then went on to make contact with the Sioux tribe, learning of and recording their little known ceremonial dances and powerful pride and dignity. Transferring from the Yellow Stone to another steamer, the Assiniboin, they continued to Fort Clark, visiting there the Mandan, Mintari and Crow tribes, then the Assiniboins at Fort Union, the main base of the American Fur Company. On a necessarily much smaller vessel they journeyed through the extraordinary geological scenery of that section of the Missouri to Fort Mackenzie in Montana, establishing a cautious friendship with the fearsome Blackfeet. From this, the westernmost point reached, it was considered too dangerous to continue and the return journey downstream began. The winter brought its own difficulties and discomforts, but Bodmer was still able to execute numerous studies of villages, dances and especially the people, who were often both intrigued and delighted by his work. The portraits are particularly notable for their capturing of individual personalities, as well as forming a primary account of what were to become virtually lost cultures.

David C. Hunt, "Karl Bodmer and the American Frontier," Imprint/Spring 1985, p.18.

Cf.Graff 4648; cf. Howes M443a; cf. Pilling 2521; cf. Sabin 47014; cf. Wagner-Camp 76:1.

#15537$685.00
 
 
BODMER, Karl (1809-1893)

The travelers meeting with the Minatarre Indians. near Fort Clark [Vig. 26]

[Vig. 26]. Paris, Coblentz and London: 1842. Hand-coloured aquatint engraving by Alex Manceau after Bodmer, issue with date added to English imprint. Plate mark: 11 1/8 x 13 1/4 inches. Sheet size: 17 x 24 1/4 inches.

This is one Bodmer's most famous images: the only depiction he made of both his sponsor, Prince Maximilian, and of himself. The travelers spent the winter of 1833-1834 at Fort Clark, between the Knife and Heart Rivers in the territory of the Mandan and Hidatsa Tribes. Bodmer here shows the first meeting with the Hidatsa outside the palisade of the fort; a carefully composed image ably portraying the wary curiosity with which the representatives of two very different ways of life greeted each other. Bodmer stands, top-hatted, to the far right, Prince Maximilian is next to him, Dreidoppel is visible behind the two of them. The individuals amongst the Hidatsa include Ahschüpsa Masihichsi (`Chief of the Pointed Horn') whom Bodmer had painted on 28 February 1834.

Karl Bodmer's images show great versatility and technical virtuosity and give us a uniquely accomplished and detailed picture of a previously little understood (and soon to vanish) way of life. Swiss-born Bodmer was engaged by Prince Maximilian zu Wied-Neuwied (1782-1867) specifically to provide a record of his travels in North America, principally among the Plains Indians. In the company of David Dreidoppel (Prince Maximilian's servant and hunting companion), their travels in North America were to last from 1832 to 1834. Well-armed with information and advice, the party finally left St.Louis, on the most important stage of their travels, aboard the steamer Yellow Stone on April 10 1833. They proceeded up the treacherous Missouri River along the line of forts established by the American Fur Company. At Bellevue they encountered their first Indians, then went on to make contact with the Sioux tribe, learning of and recording their little known ceremonial dances and powerful pride and dignity. Transferring from the Yellow Stone to another steamer, the Assiniboin, they continued to Fort Clark, visiting there the Mandan, Mintari and Crow tribes, then the Assiniboins at Fort Union, the main base of the American Fur Company. On a necessarily much smaller vessel they journeyed through the extraordinary geological scenery of that section of the Missouri to Fort Mackenzie in Montana, establishing a cautious friendship with the fearsome Blackfeet. From this, the westernmost point reached, it was considered too dangerous to continue and the return journey downstream began. The winter brought its own difficulties and discomforts, but Bodmer was still able to execute numerous studies of villages, dances and especially the people, who were often both intrigued and delighted by his work. The portraits are particularly notable for their capturing of individual personalities, as well as forming a primary account of what were to become virtually lost cultures.

Graff 4648; Howes M443a; Pilling 2521; Sabin 47014; Wagner-Camp 76:1.

#15661$2,250.00
 
 
BODMER, Karl (1809-1893)

The White Castels on the Upper Missouri [Tab. 37]

[Tab. 37]. Paris, Coblenz and London: [1839-1842]. Hand-coloured aquatint engraving by Himely after Bodmer, blindstamp. One small repaired tear to upper blank margin not affecting plate area. Plate mark: 15 3/4 x 20 5/8 inches. Sheet size: 17 1/4 x 23 7/8 inches.

Prince Maximilian and his party left Fort Union on 6 July aboard the 60-foot keelboat Flora and eventually arrived at Fort McKenzie on 9 August 1833. In his journal for 25 July Prince Maximilian describes the parties first view of the rock formation: `we reached a turn in the river, and sailed, for some time, rapidly upwards. This brought us to a remarkable place, where we thought that we saw before us, two white mountain castles. On the mountain of the south bank, there was a thick, snow-white layer, a far-extended stratum of a white sand-stone, which had been partly acted upon by the waters. At the end where it is exposed, being intersected by the valley, two high pieces, in the shape of buildings, had remained standing, and upon them lay remains of a more compact, yellowish red, thinner stratum of sand-stone, which formed the roofs of the united building. On the façade of the whole building, there were small perpendicular slits, which appeared to be so many windows'.

Karl Bodmer's images show great versatility and technical virtuosity and give us a uniquely accomplished and detailed picture of a previously little understood (and soon to vanish) way of life. Swiss-born Bodmer was engaged by Prince Maximilian zu Wied-Neuwied (1782-1867) specifically to provide a record of his travels in North America, principally among the Plains Indians. In the company of David Dreidoppel (Prince Maximilian's servant and hunting companion), their travels in North America were to last from 1832 to 1834. Well-armed with information and advice, the party finally left St.Louis, on the most important stage of their travels, aboard the steamer Yellow Stone on April 10 1833. They proceeded up the treacherous Missouri River along the line of forts established by the American Fur Company. At Bellevue they encountered their first Indians, then went on to make contact with the Sioux tribe, learning of and recording their little known ceremonial dances and powerful pride and dignity. Transferring from the Yellow Stone to another steamer, the Assiniboin, they continued to Fort Clark, visiting there the Mandan, Mintari and Crow tribes, then the Assiniboins at Fort Union, the main base of the American Fur Company. On a necessarily much smaller vessel they journeyed through the extraordinary geological scenery of that section of the Missouri to Fort Mackenzie in Montana, establishing a cautious friendship with the fearsome Blackfeet. From this, the westernmost point reached, it was considered too dangerous to continue and the return journey downstream began. The winter brought its own difficulties and discomforts, but Bodmer was still able to execute numerous studies of villages, dances and especially the people, who were often both intrigued and delighted by his work. The portraits are particularly notable for their capturing of individual personalities, as well as forming a primary account of what were to become virtually lost cultures.

Graff 4648; Howes M443a; Pilling 2521; Sabin 47014; Wagner-Camp 76:1.

#4250$4,000.00
 
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