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GAMY-MONTAUT after Georges BRIC

Prix de la Nature (100 kil)/ E Dubonnet le gagnant sur monoplan Tellier moteur Panhard

Paris: Mabileau & Co., 1910. Hand-coloured pochoir print. Very good condition. Image size (including text): 16 1/4 x 33 3/8 inches. Sheet size: 17 3/4 x 35 1/8 inches.

The little known Tellier monoplane. As the man who was at the helm of the tow-boat for Voisin's Box-kite glider trials on the Seine, Tellier had long been associated with Voisin & Panhard.

The Gamy-Montaut prints document various historical events in the early history of motorized transportation, including Power Boat Racing, Motorcycle and Motor Car Racing, Motor Car Touring, Zeppelins and Airplanes.

Having observed the rapidly growing interest in cars and racing during the early years of motor cars, Ernest Montaut produced his first motoring prints in the mid-1890s, and by 1897, his drawings were pictorial records of the many races in France. Montaut's work was extremely well received in the Paris of his day and was shown in the fashionable shops of the Rue de l'Opera and Rue de la Paix, as well as in the better galleries.

Marguerite Montaut, Ernest's wife, joined him in his work producing not only racing prints but also developing a fine series of aviation prints commemorating such events as the first flights on the early European mail routes. While Marguerite Montaut's works were occasionally signed "M. Montaut", she also used the name "Gamy", an anagram for Magy.

The Gamy-Montaut prints were all produced by the pochoir process in which the outlines for each image were drawn onto lithographic stones and printed. Using these uncoloured prints as a template, elaborate stencils were cut for each colour. Water-colour was then brushed onto the image through the stencil. The colouring process was quite complex, with each print taking several days to produce. It was also quite labour intensive, and the studio of Gamy-Montaut therefore employed a group of trained artists, including Nevil and Campion, to assist in the colouring.

#21676$850.00
 
 
GAMY-MONTAUT after NEVIL

L'equipe "La Licorne" dans le Tour de France 1912 / Magneto Bosch, Carburateur Claudel

Paris: Mabileau & Co., c. 1912. Hand-coloured pochoir print. Very good condition apart from some overall light soiling. Image size (including text): approximately 15 1/8 x 32 inches. Sheet size: approximately 17 5/8 x 35 3/8 inches.

The four cylinder, 10HP motor model pictured here was manufactured by the French company La Licorne (The Unicorn) and raced in the Tour de France of 1912 and 1913. La Licorne, which was named in honor of the founder, J. Corré, on whose family crest the fabled beast appeared, quickly became one of the most significant French automobile manufacturers.

The Gamy-Montaut prints document various historical events in the early history of transportation, including Power Boat Racing, Motorcycle and Motor Car Racing, Motor Car Touring, Zeppelins and Tennis.

Having observed the rapidly growing interest in cars and racing during the early years of motor cars, Ernest Montaut produced his first motoring prints in the mid-1890s, and by 1897, his drawings were pictorial records of the many races in France. Montaut's work was extremely well received in the Paris of his day and was shown in the fashionable shops of the Rue de l'Opera and Rue de la Paix, as well as in the better galleries.

Marguerite Montaut, Ernest's wife, joined him in his work producing not only racing prints but also developing a fine series of aviation prints commemorating such events as the first flights on the early European mail routes. While Marguerite Montaut's works were occasionally signed "M. Montaut", she also used the name "Gamy", an anagram for Magy.

The Gamy-Montaut prints were all produced by the pochoir process in which the outlines for each image were drawn onto lithographic stones and printed. Using these uncoloured prints as a template, elaborate stencils were cut for each colour. Water-colour was then brushed onto the image through the stencil. The colouring process was quite complex, with each print taking several days to produce. It was also quite labour intensive, and the studio of Gamy-Montaut therefore employed a group of trained artists, including Nevil and Campion, to assist in the colouring.

#7242$850.00
 
 
GAMY-MONTAUT and H. L. Roowy

[Cycles Motos Alcyon] [Lehmann et Jolly motos Alcyon 1914]

Colombes: Mabileau & Co., 1914. Hand-coloured pochoir print. Very good condition. Image size (including text): approximately 26 1/2 x 12 1/4 inches. Sheet size: approximately 35 3/8 x 17 3/4 inches.

Founded in 1902 by the industrialist Edmond Gentil, Alcyon was a manufacturer of motorcycles and cycles. Renowned for their sturdiness and buoyancy, their motorbikes were built with a Swiss ZL engine beginning in 1904.

The Gamy-Montaut prints document various historical events in the early history of motorized transportation, including Power Boat Racing, Motorcycle and Motor Car Racing, Motor Car Touring, Zeppelins and Airplanes.

Having observed the rapidly growing interest in cars and racing during the early years of motor cars, Ernest Montaut ( 1879-1909) produced his first motoring prints in the mid-1890s, and by 1897, his drawings were pictorial records of the many races in France. Montaut's work was extremely well received in the Paris of his day and was shown in the fashionable shops of the Rue de l'Opera and Rue de la Paix, as well as in the better galleries.

Marguerite M. Montaut, Ernest's wife, continued his work after his death producing not only racing prints but also developing a fine series of aviation prints commemorating such events as the first flights on the early European mail routes. While Marguerite Montaut's works were occasionally signed "M. Montaut", she usually used "Gamy", an anagram for Magy.

The Gamy-Montaut prints were all produced by the pochoir process in which the outlines for each image were drawn onto lithographic stones and printed. Using these uncoloured prints as a template, elaborate stencils were cut for each colour. Water-colour was then brushed onto the image through the stencil. The colouring process was quite complex, with each print taking several days to produce. It was also quite labour intensive, and the studio of Gamy-Montaut therefore employed a group of trained artists, including Nevil and Campion, to assist in the colouring.

#7281$650.00
 
 
GAMY-MONTAUT

"Gabriel sur Mors" depasse pour la premiere fois une moyenne de 100 a l'heure sur route gagnant la course Paris-Madrid 1903 (600 kilom a une moyenne de 106 a l'heure)

Paris: [Mabileau & Co.], 1903. Hand-coloured pochoir print. Very good condition. Image size (including text): approximately 14 1/8 x 31 1/8 inches. Sheet size: approximately 17 1/4 x 35 1/2 inches.

The pass for the lead made by Gabriel over the very recognizable "Shovel-nose". Mors, the driver behind Gabriel, had limited success in these races, this 70 horse power chain-driven car being the exception. There is some confusion as to the actual number on the car during this race, with some records indicating #6 rather than #168 as shown. This was Fernand Gabriel's only win in a career that lasted until 1923. He was killed during an RAF air raid on Paris in 1943. The 1903 Paris-Madrid race is infamous in racing history. The cars were extremely well-powered for the time, though not as well-endowed with breaking power. The speculators crowded the route for the race, and casualties resulted. Other oddities included one car whose transmission became stuck in reverse and was driven that way for 25 miles.

The Gamy-Montaut prints document various historical events in the early history of transportation, including Power Boat Racing, Motorcycle and Motor Car Racing, Motor Car Touring, Zeppelins and Tennis.

Having observed the rapidly growing interest in cars and racing during the early years of motor cars, Ernest Montaut produced his first motoring prints in the mid-1890s, and by 1897, his drawings were pictorial records of the many races in France. Montaut's work was extremely well received in the Paris of his day and was shown in the fashionable shops of the Rue de l'Opera and Rue de la Paix, as well as in the better galleries.

Marguerite Montaut, Ernest's wife, joined him in his work producing not only racing prints but also developing a fine series of aviation prints commemorating such events as the first flights on the early European mail routes. While Marguerite Montaut's works were occasionally signed "M. Montaut", she also used the name "Gamy", an anagram for Magy.

The Gamy-Montaut prints were all produced by the pochoir process in which the outlines for each image were drawn onto lithographic stones and printed. Using these uncoloured prints as a template, elaborate stencils were cut for each colour. Water-colour was then brushed onto the image through the stencil. The colouring process was quite complex, with each print taking several days to produce. It was also quite labour intensive, and the studio of Gamy-Montaut therefore employed a group of trained artists, including Nevil and Campion, to assist in the colouring.

#7235$850.00
 
 
GAMY-MONTAUT

"Zeppelin"

Paris: [Mabileau & Co.], c. 1915. Hand-coloured pochoir print. Very good condition apart from some overall light soiling in the margins and the image. Small loss upper right edge. Image size (including text): 13 1/2 x 31 1/4 inches. Sheet size: 17 3/4 x 35 inches.

This LZ2 was built sometime between 1910 and 1914. Five airships of this design operated by Delag, safely carried 35,000 passengers between German cities. This was the first passenger air service in the world.

The Gamy-Montaut prints document various historical events in the early history of motorized transportation, including Power Boat Racing, Motorcycle and Motor Car Racing, Motor Car Touring, Zeppelins and Airplanes.

Having observed the rapidly growing interest in cars and racing during the early years of motor cars, Ernest Montaut produced his first motoring prints in the mid-1890s, and by 1897, his drawings were pictorial records of the many races in France. Montaut's work was extremely well received in the Paris of his day and was shown in the fashionable shops of the Rue de l'Opera and Rue de la Paix, as well as in the better galleries.

Marguerite Montaut, Ernest's wife, joined him in his work producing not only racing prints but also developing a fine series of aviation prints commemorating such events as the first flights on the early European mail routes. While Marguerite Montaut's works were occasionally signed "M. Montaut", she also used the name "Gamy", an anagram for Magy.

The Gamy-Montaut prints were all produced by the pochoir process in which the outlines for each image were drawn onto lithographic stones and printed. Using these uncoloured prints as a template, elaborate stencils were cut for each colour. Water-colour was then brushed onto the image through the stencil. The colouring process was quite complex, with each print taking several days to produce. It was also quite labour intensive, and the studio of Gamy-Montaut therefore employed a group of trained artists, including Nevil and Campion, to assist in the colouring.

#21694$750.00
 
 
GAMY-MONTAUT

Circuit de l'Est / Paris Troyes Nancy Mezieres Amiens Paris / Leblanc le gagnant passe pres de Mars-la-Tour sur monoplan Bleriot, moteur Gnoeme, magneto Bosch

Paris: Mabileau & Co., 1910. Hand-coloured pochoir print. Very good condition, paper mildly toned. Image size (including text): 15 3/4 x 29 3/4 inches. Sheet size: 17 3/4 x 35 3/8 inches.

Alfred Le Blanc and his Bleriot XI winning the first of the long distance air races. In October of 1910, at Belmont New York, Le Blanc set a new speed record of 66.22 mph. The aircraft was destroyed on landing, when he apparently flew into the middle of a telephone pole. He survived and flew again.

The Gamy-Montaut prints document various historical events in the early history of motorized transportation, including Power Boat Racing, Motorcycle and Motor Car Racing, Motor Car Touring, Zeppelins and Airplanes.

Having observed the rapidly growing interest in cars and racing during the early years of motor cars, Ernest Montaut produced his first motoring prints in the mid-1890s, and by 1897, his drawings were pictorial records of the many races in France. Montaut's work was extremely well received in the Paris of his day and was shown in the fashionable shops of the Rue de l'Opera and Rue de la Paix, as well as in the better galleries.

Marguerite Montaut, Ernest's wife, joined him in his work producing not only racing prints but also developing a fine series of aviation prints commemorating such events as the first flights on the early European mail routes. While Marguerite Montaut's works were occasionally signed "M. Montaut", she also used the name "Gamy", an anagram for Magy.

The Gamy-Montaut prints were all produced by the pochoir process in which the outlines for each image were drawn onto lithographic stones and printed. Using these uncoloured prints as a template, elaborate stencils were cut for each colour. Water-colour was then brushed onto the image through the stencil. The colouring process was quite complex, with each print taking several days to produce. It was also quite labour intensive, and the studio of Gamy-Montaut therefore employed a group of trained artists, including Nevil and Campion, to assist in the colouring.

#21684$750.00
 
 
GAMY-MONTAUT

Circuit Europeen / 1r Beaumont 2e Garros sur monoplan Bleriot, Moteur Gnome Magneto Bosch, Helice Normale

Paris: Mabileau & Co., 1911. Hand-coloured pochoir print. Very good condition apart from some overall light soiling. Image size (including text): 13 1/4 x 33 inches. Sheet size: 17 1/4 x 35 1/2 inches.

The picture is touting Beaumont as the winner of the 1911 Circuit of Europe Air Race. André Beaumont was a pseudonym used by Jean Conneau. Conneau collected $ 32,000 for his victory.

The Gamy-Montaut prints document various historical events in the early history of transportation, including Power Boat Racing, Motorcycle and Motor Car Racing, Motor Car Touring, Zeppelins and Tennis.

Having observed the rapidly growing interest in cars and racing during the early years of motor cars, Ernest Montaut produced his first motoring prints in the mid-1890s, and by 1897, his drawings were pictorial records of the many races in France. Montaut's work was extremely well received in the Paris of his day and was shown in the fashionable shops of the Rue de l'Opera and Rue de la Paix, as well as in the better galleries.

Marguerite Montaut, Ernest's wife, joined him in his work producing not only racing prints but also developing a fine series of aviation prints commemorating such events as the first flights on the early European mail routes. While Marguerite Montaut's works were occasionally signed "M. Montaut", she also used the name "Gamy", an anagram for Magy.

The Gamy-Montaut prints were all produced by the pochoir process in which the outlines for each image were drawn onto lithographic stones and printed. Using these uncoloured prints as a template, elaborate stencils were cut for each colour. Water-colour was then brushed onto the image through the stencil. The colouring process was quite complex, with each print taking several days to produce. It was also quite labour intensive, and the studio of Gamy-Montaut therefore employed a group of trained artists, including Nevil and Campion, to assist in the colouring.

#5459$600.00
 
 
GAMY-MONTAUT

Coupe du Salon 1904. Dietrich III barré par Perignon. 1er du classement general des Cruisers Record du monde.

Paris: [Mabileau & Co.], 1904. Hand-coloured pochoir print. Very good condition . Image size (including text): 14 3/4 x 31 5/8 inches. Sheet size: 17 5/8 x 35 1/8 inches.

The Gamy-Montaut prints document various historical events in the early history of motorized transportation, including Power Boat Racing, Motorcycle and Motor Car Racing, Motor Car Touring, Zeppelins and Airplanes.

Having observed the rapidly growing interest in cars and racing during the early years of motor cars, Ernest Montaut produced his first motoring prints in the mid-1890s, and by 1897, his drawings were pictorial records of the many races in France. Montaut's work was extremely well received in the Paris of his day and was shown in the fashionable shops of the Rue de l'Opera and Rue de la Paix, as well as in the better galleries.

Marguerite Montaut, Ernest's wife, joined him in his work producing not only racing prints but also developing a fine series of aviation prints commemorating such events as the first flights on the early European mail routes. While Marguerite Montaut's works were occasionally signed "M. Montaut", she also used the name "Gamy", an anagram for Magy.

The Gamy-Montaut prints were all produced by the pochoir process in which the outlines for each image were drawn onto lithographic stones and printed. Using these uncoloured prints as a template, elaborate stencils were cut for each colour. Water-colour was then brushed onto the image through the stencil. The colouring process was quite complex, with each print taking several days to produce. It was also quite labour intensive, and the studio of Gamy-Montaut therefore employed a group of trained artists, including Nevil and Campion, to assist in the colouring.

#21615$750.00
 
 
GAMY-MONTAUT

Gd Prix de L'A.C.F. 1913 (Motorcyclettes) / 1er Greame Fenton sur autocyclette Clement Pneu Dunlop, Carburateur Longuemare bougie Eyquem

Paris: Mabileau & Co., 1913. Hand-coloured pochoir print. Very good condition apart from some overall light soiling. Image size (including text): 15 3/4 x 28 3/8 inches. Sheet size: 17 3/4 x 35 3/8 inches.

Organized in 1906 by the Automobile Club of France, the Grand Prix was divided into multiple racing classes based on weight. The lowest of these four classes included motorcyles and tricycles. Here Graeme Fenton races a Clement autocyclette equipped with Pneu Dunlop tires.

The Gamy-Montaut prints document various historical events in the early history of motorized transportation, including Power Boat Racing, Motorcycle and Motor Car Racing, Motor Car Touring, Zeppelins and Airplanes.

Having observed the rapidly growing interest in cars and racing during the early years of motor cars, Ernest Montaut (1879-1909) produced his first motoring prints in the mid-1890s, and by 1897, his drawings were pictorial records of the many races in France. Montaut's work was extremely well received in the Paris of his day and was shown in the fashionable shops of the Rue de l'Opera and Rue de la Paix, as well as in the better galleries.

Marguerite M. Montaut, Ernest's wife, continued his work after his death producing not only racing prints but also developing a fine series of aviation prints commemorating such events as the first flights on the early European mail routes. While Marguerite Montaut's works were occasionally signed "M. Montaut", she usually used "Gamy", an anagram for Magy.

The Gamy-Montaut prints were all produced by the pochoir process in which the outlines for each image were drawn onto lithographic stones and printed. Using these uncoloured prints as a template, elaborate stencils were cut for each colour. Water-colour was then brushed onto the image through the stencil. The colouring process was quite complex, with each print taking several days to produce. It was also quite labour intensive, and the studio of Gamy-Montaut therefore employed a group of trained artists, including Nevil and Campion, to assist in the colouring.

#7921$650.00
 
 
GAMY-MONTAUT

Grand Prix d'Amerique, Goux le gagnant sur Peugeot à Indianapolis (Indianapolis 500), 1911

Paris: Mabileau & Co., 1913. Hand-coloured pochoir print. Very good condition apart from a 1 1/2" tear in the top margin. Image size (including text): 15 3/4 x 32 1/4 inches. Sheet size: 17 5/8 x 35 3/8 inches.

The Lion-Peugeot of Jules Goux at Indianapolis in 1911. This was the last year of this complex car. The new Peugeot Company began racing in 1912, and won the Indy with Goux at the wheel in 1913.

The Gamy-Montaut prints document various historical events in the early history of motorized transportation, including Power Boat Racing, Motorcycle and Motor Car Racing, Motor Car Touring, Zeppelins and Airplanes.

Having observed the rapidly growing interest in cars and racing during the early years of motor cars, Ernest Montaut ( 1879-1909) produced his first motoring prints in the mid-1890s, and by 1897, his drawings were pictorial records of the many races in France. Montaut's work was extremely well received in the Paris of his day and was shown in the fashionable shops of the Rue de l'Opera and Rue de la Paix, as well as in the better galleries.

Marguerite M. Montaut, Ernest's wife, continued his work after his death producing not only racing prints but also developing a fine series of aviation prints commemorating such events as the first flights on the early European mail routes. While Marguerite Montaut's works were occasionally signed "M. Montaut", she usually used "Gamy", an anagram for Magy.

The Gamy-Montaut prints were all produced by the pochoir process in which the outlines for each image were drawn onto lithographic stones and printed. Using these uncoloured prints as a template, elaborate stencils were cut for each colour. Water-colour was then brushed onto the image through the stencil. The colouring process was quite complex, with each print taking several days to produce. It was also quite labour intensive, and the studio of Gamy-Montaut therefore employed a group of trained artists, including Nevil and Campion, to assist in the colouring.

#7649$1,750.00
 
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