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Ludlow Castle Shropshire. ANONYMOUS.

Ludlow Castle Shropshire

London: Published by J. Deeley, No. 95 Berwick Street, Oct. 1812. Coloured aquatint. Printed on wove paper. In excellent condition with the exception of some light sunning where a mat was in place. Plate mark is faint. Image size: 14 3/4 x 19 5/8 inches. Sheet size: 19 5/16 x 23 3/4 inches. Plate mark: 17 1/2 x 21 3/8 inches.

A commanding view of Ludlow Castle in Shropshire.

After the Norman invasion, a string of castles was planned along the English/Welsh border to guard against the unconquered Welsh, and Ludlow held one of the strongest defensive positions. The castle was built by Walter de Lacy in the late 11th century, and his family retained the lordship until the end of the 13th century. It then passed through various hands until it was taken over by the Mortimer family. In 1425 it was passed to Richard Plantagenet, the leader of the Yorkists in the Wars of the Roses, but it was taken and sacked by the Lancastrians in 1459. In 1461 when Richard's son became Edward IV, the castle became Crown property and remained so for 350 years. Edward and Richard, the two princes in the Tower, spent most of their childhood at Ludlow and Edward was there when he heard of his father's death and his accession to the throne as Edward V. They went to London for his coronation but were imprisoned in the Tower and shortly afterwards murdered. Henry VII's eldest son, Prince Arthur and his wife, Catherine of Aragon, were staying at Ludlow when he died in 1502 and his heart is buried there. His death led his younger brother to become Henry VIII on their father's death and to marry Arthur's widow who became the first of Henry's six wives. The buildings fell into disrepair during the 18th century but were restored by the Earl of Powis in 1771.

Item #13603

Price: $850.00

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