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The Luxembourg or Palais du Senat with the Gardens and the Church of St. Sulpice on the left. ANONYMOUS.

The Luxembourg or Palais du Senat with the Gardens and the Church of St. Sulpice on the left

London: Richard Phillips, 71 St. Pauls Church Yard, Oct. 1st, 1803. Engraving. Printed on wove paper. In excellent condition with the exception of two skillfully mended tears on the top margin outside the platemark. Top left corner has been expertly in-filled. Small mended tear on left margin outside platemark. Three tiny mended tears on bottom edge of sheet. Image size (including text): 10 9/16 x 19 ½ inches. Sheet size: 17 ½ x 24 ¾ inches. Plate mark: 14 x 21 7/8 inches.

A charming view of the Luxembourg Gardens in Paris published by Richard Phillips, the infamous Jacobite printseller.

Towards the middle of the eighteenth century a trend developed amongst English and European artists and printmakers, which sought to visually record their country's natural beauties. Sparked by a sense of national confidence and patriotism, artists and printmakers began to publish topographical prints of important sights and architectural attractions. In addition to being a visual record of the countryside they were meant to encourage public recognition of national treasures. These topographical prints were aimed at English and foreign tourists who desired a memento of their travels, or at those vicarious tourists who collected topographical prints instead of traveling. Published in both English and French this charming view is a superb example of the popular topographical prints, which Phillips sold in great quantity in his London shop.

A true jack-of-all-trades, Sir Richard Phillips (1767 - 1840), was one of the most fascinating men of his day. Born in London to a Leicestershire family, his original name was Philip Richard. He began his career as hosier, but in 1790 established himself as a publisher and bookseller in Leicester. In 1792 he founded the "Leicester Herald", which he used as a platform for his radical beliefs. An ardent Jacobite, Phillip's shop became a depot for radical literature of the revolutionary period. In 1795 he was imprisoned for selling Paines' "Rights of Man", but he continued to edit the Leicester Herald throughout his imprisonment. After his release he set up his business in London where he established the infamous, "Monthly" magazine. In 1807 he became a sheriff of the City of London and was knighted in 1808. His publications included a vast number of elementary class books and cheap manuals as well as fine art prints and maps.

Dictionary of National Biography.

Item #16091

Price: $550.00

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