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Original detailed architectural technical-drawing of the construction of archways, titled 'Planchers Combles Feuille III'. ECOLE DES BEAUX-ARTS -, architect, J. LITOUX.

Original detailed architectural technical-drawing of the construction of archways, titled 'Planchers Combles Feuille III'

[Paris: circa 1850]. Pencil, pen and wash drawing, with numerous sub-titles in ink, signed "J. Litoux" Sheet size: 22 1/2 x 37 inches.

A fascinating and beautiful architectural drawing - or 'rendu' of basic elements of house construction in cluding walls, floors, doorways, roofs and ceilings.

A fine drawing from an architectural student at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris, the most influential architectural school in existence during much of the 18th century, the whole of the 19th century and the first part of the 20th century. 'Students were eligible for the Ecole if they were at least fifteen years old, or under thirty. They began with the seconde classe, in which they competed in the concours d'émulation. These alternated between an esquisse - a rough sketch for which up to twelve hours was allowed - and a rendu - the large-scale finished drawing for which one to three months were allowed... Two to four years were usually required for a student to accumulate enough credits to enter the première classe. The same system was followed again, usually for two to three years, after which the student should have accumulated enough credits to compete for the Grand Prix de Rome. The winner of the Grand Prix was entitled to five years study under the auspices of the French Academy in Rome... For each of his first three years he was required to submit an analytical study of an ancient monument. For his fourth year he had to submit a complete reconstruction of a major classical work. For his fifth year he was required to submit an original work designed to a program of his own invention... In the seconde classe the student was required to attend a variety of lectures in theory, history, and construction, and learned to prepare construction drawings... Work was done at ateliers located outside the precincts of the Ecole des Beaux-Arts. These were rented and organized by the students themselves, and the students had the right to invite a teacher of their own choice to serve as their maître. The teacher himself did not have to be a member of the faculty of the Ecole, nor - at least in principle - did he have to be a practicing architect.' (Arthur Drexler. The Architecture of the Ecole des Beaux-Arts. New York, MoMA, 1977, p.8-9)

Arthur Drexler, The Architecture of the Ecole des Beaux-Arts. New York, MoMA, 1977.

Item #20700

Price: $1,750.00

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