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Voyages a Peking, Manille et L'Ile de France. Chretien-Louis-Joseph de GUIGNES.
Voyages a Peking, Manille et L'Ile de France
Voyages a Peking, Manille et L'Ile de France
Voyages a Peking, Manille et L'Ile de France
Voyages a Peking, Manille et L'Ile de France

Voyages a Peking, Manille et L'Ile de France

Paris: de L'Imprimerie Imperiale, 1808. 4 volumes (3 octavo text vols (7 5/8 x 4 7/8 inches); folio atlas (16 1/8 x 10 1/4 inches)). Text: [2], lxiii, 439; [2], 476; [2], 488pp. Atlas: [4]pp. 92 engraved plates on 60 sheets [32 sheets with two engraved images, the remaining with single images] and 5 engraved maps on 6 sheets (one map on two folding sheets, 4 folding).

Text: contemporary mottled calf, spine gilt in six compartments with raised bands, red morocco lettering piece in the second, green morocco lettering piece in the third, red edges. Atlas: bound to match, quarter mottled calf over patterned paper boards.

First edition of this important collection of voyages and source on early Chinese commerce.

De Guignes lived in China for seventeen years, including service as an interpreter to the Dutch embassy to Beijing (1794-1795), led by Titsingh and Van Braam. "Guignes, like his father before him, became an Orientalist scholar. He was appointed French resident in China and Consul in Canton in 1784. Ten years later, in 1794-95, he was an interpreter with the Dutch Embassy to Peking ... This book, quite a comprehensive account, touches upon such subjects as industry, trades, professions, foreign trading companies, etc. The atlas of engraved plates includes views, maps, and charts ... Guignes was both fluent and interested in the Chinese language, and he published a Chinese-French-Latin dictionary in 1813" (Hill). The atlas presents a wide variety of views of contemporary Chinese dress, architectural monuments, sailing vessels, city views, ceremonies, tombs, and more. The two extra plates in the Atlas show a Chinese pagoda at the port of Macao, and a view of the western gate of the Tartar (Inner) City in Peking. These two extra plates are allegedly only found in about six copies of the atlas, according to the Canadian Centre for Architecture. "Guignes, like his father before him, became an Orientalist scholar. He was appointed French resident in China and Consul in Canton in 1784. Ten years later, in 1794-95, he was an interpreter with the Dutch Embassy to Peking. In all, he spent seventeen years in China. This book, quite a comprehensive account, touches upon such subjects as industry, trades, professions, foreign trading companies, etc. The atlas of engraved plates includes views, maps, and charts. The sections on the Philippines and Mauritius were translated into English and printed in volume eleven of Pinkerton's A General Collection ... (1808-14). Guignes was both fluent and interested in the Chinese language, and he published a Chinese-French-Latin dictionary in 1813" (Hill). "Voyages a Peking...was published in 1808 by Chretien Louis Joseph de Guignes, the son of the French sinologist Joseph de Guignes. A lengthy commentary recounting the younger de Guignes's seventeen years in Southeast Asia, the Voyages focused on his journey to Beijing as an interpreter for the Dutch embassy led by Isaac Titsingh and Andreas Everardus van Braam Houckgeest in the years 1794 and 1795" (Reed & Dematte).

Hill 733; Lust 336; Cordier 2351-2352; Morrison II, 104; Mollendorf 1487; Lowendahl 738; Reed & Dematte (2007), pp.160-61; Pardo de Tavera 1287.

Item #34407

Price: $9,500.00

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