Skip to main content
650Considerations on the Propriety of Imposing Taxes in British Colonies, for the Purpose of Raising a Revenue, by Act of Parliament. Daniel DULANY.
650Considerations on the Propriety of Imposing Taxes in British Colonies, for the Purpose of Raising a Revenue, by Act of Parliament

650Considerations on the Propriety of Imposing Taxes in British Colonies, for the Purpose of Raising a Revenue, by Act of Parliament

London: Re-printed for J. Almon, opposite Burlington-House, Piccadilly, 1766. 8vo. (7 5/8 x 4 7/8 inches). [6], 81, [1]pp.

Bound to style in half brown calf over 18th-century marbled paper boards, spine in six compartments with raised bands, red morocco lettering piece in the second.

First English edition of this work by the most influential American voice against the Stamp Act of 1765.

In order to police the frontier and pay down the debt they had incurred in the French and Indian War, the King and Parliament began levying a series of taxes on the American colonists, including the Stamp Act of 1765 and the Sugar Act of 1763. The colonists protested these new taxes to which they were not accustomed and began to question their place in the English empire, though they were not able to properly express their outrage until Dulany wrote this pamphlet. Dulany was a politician and lawyer from a wealthy family in Maryland who had been educated at Eton College and Cambridge University. He was loyal to the British but came out in support of the colonists' opposition, with this "forceful argument against taxation without representation" (Howes D550). The pamphlet was circulated widely and was extremely influential in the development of the colonists' demand for "no taxation without representation." Though he was among the first pamphleteers whose words inspired the Revolution, Dulany himself was a Loyalist who promoted more moderate solutions and was later denounced and his property confiscated for not supporting the revolutionary cause. "Of all the controversial writings provoked in the American colonies by the passage of the Stamp Act, Daniel Dulanys Considerations on the Propriety of Imposing Taxes was undoubtedly the most significant and most influential" (Alden, "New England Quarterly" XXII:705).

Adams, Independence 29; Sabin 21170; Adams 65-6b; ESTC T31541.

Item #39587

Price: $6,500.00

See all items in Americana & Canadiana
See all items by