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Item #40238 The Appeal Farther Defended; In Answer to the Farther Misrepresentations of Dr. Chauncy. Thomas Bradbury CHANDLER, Beilby PORTEUS, Archbishop Thomas SECKER.
The Appeal Farther Defended; In Answer to the Farther Misrepresentations of Dr. Chauncy
The Appeal Farther Defended; In Answer to the Farther Misrepresentations of Dr. Chauncy
The Appeal Farther Defended; In Answer to the Farther Misrepresentations of Dr. Chauncy
The Appeal Farther Defended; In Answer to the Farther Misrepresentations of Dr. Chauncy
The Appeal Farther Defended; In Answer to the Farther Misrepresentations of Dr. Chauncy

The Appeal Farther Defended; In Answer to the Farther Misrepresentations of Dr. Chauncy

New York: Hugh Gaine, at his Book Store and Printing-Office, in Hanover-Square, 1771. Title, [ii-iii], iv-vi, errata leaf, [1] 2-240. 248 pp. [With:] THE CLERGY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY. An Address from the Clergy of New-York and New-Jersey, to the Episcopalians in Virginia; Occasioned by Some Late Transactions in that Colony Relative to an American Episcopate. New York: Hugh Gaine, at his Book Store and Printing-Office, in Hanover-Square, 1771. Title, Half-title, title, [1] 2-58 [2]. 64 pp. [And:] PORTEUS, Beilby (1731-1809). A Review of the Life and Character of Archbishop Secker. New-York: Hugh Gaine, at the Bible and Crown in Hanover-Square, 1773. Re-printed from the London Edition. Half-title, Title, [i] ii-iii [iv], i-lxviii. 76 pp. [And:] CHANDLER, Thomas Bradbury. An Appendix to the American Edition of the Life of Archbishop Secker: Containing His Grace's Letter to the Revd. Mr. Macclanechan, on the Irregularity of his Conduct; with an Introductory Narrative. New York: H. Gaine, at his Book Store and Printing-Office, at the Bible and Crown, in Hanover-Square, 1774. Title, [iii] iv-xx. [1] 2-28. 48 pp. [And:] CHANDLER, Thomas Bradbury. A Free Examination of the Critical Commentary on Archbishop Secker's Letter to Mr. Walpole: To Which is Added, by Way of Appendix, A Copy of Bishop Sherlock's Memorial. New-York: Hugh Gaine, at the Bible and Crown, in Hanover-Square, 1774. Title, iii-iv [v] vi-xii, [1] 2-102 [103] 104-122 [2] Errata, advertisement. 136 pp. 5 volumes bound in 1; 8vo (7 11/16 x 4 1/2 inches).

Expertly bound to style in half 18th-century calf over 18th-century marbled paper-covered boards, the flat spine divided into six compartments by gilt fillets and roll tools, red Morocco lettering-piece in the second compartment, the others with repeat decoration in gilt. Occasional ink annotations in a contemporary hand.

The American Episcopalian controversy, stoked by the possible imposition of British Anglican bishops on the American colonists, dominated religious discourse in the Colonies. Here are five rare works from that generative debate, bound together in a sumptuous volume, serving as an eyelet onto the separation of Church and State in America and its gestation.

Thomas Bradbury Chandler was an Anglican clergyman and influential figure in the religious and political controversies of colonial America. Born in Woodstock, Connecticut, he graduated from the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University) in 1745. Ordained as an Anglican priest in 1747, he served in Elizabethtown and Elizabeth, New Jersey, where he gained a reputation for his eloquent preaching and unwavering commitment to the Church of England. Chandler vehemently opposed religious dissenters and advocated for the establishment of the Church of England as the dominant religious institution in the American colonies. His publication An Appeal to the Public in Behalf of the Church of England in America ignited the Anglican Bishop Controversy, intensifying tensions between Anglicans and dissenters during the revolutionary era. Chandler remained loyal to the British Crown during the American Revolution and eventually relocated to Nova Scotia, where he continued his ministry until his death in 1790. Due to his controversial positions, Chandler's writings contributed to the broader discourse on religious establishment, religious freedom, and the role of religion in colonial society. The Appeal Farther Defended was published in 1771 as a response to Dr. Charles Chauncy's criticisms of Chandler's earlier publication, An Appeal to the Public. In it, Chandler addresses and counters the arguments made by Chauncy, who was a prominent Congregationalist minister and a vocal critic of the Church of England. Chandler specifically focuses on Chauncy's misrepresentations and challenges his criticisms of the Anglican Church. Chandler's work was part of a larger ongoing debate between proponents of the Church of England and dissenters in the American colonies. The present collection of works represents debates that touched on issues of religious authority, governance, and the relationship between church and state, of which Chandler's writings are fascinating examples. Another individual whose work appears in this grouping is Beilby Porteus. Porteus was an Anglican clergyman, bishop, and social reformer in 18th-century York, England. After his education at Christ's College, Cambridge, Porteus was ordained as a priest in 1757. He gained recognition for his sermons, which were known for their clarity, moral teachings, and emphasis on social justice. He became a popular preacher in London and served as the chaplain to King George III. In 1769, he was appointed as the Bishop of Chester. As a bishop, Porteus was actively involved in various social and humanitarian causes. He was an advocate for the abolition of the slave trade and supported the work of abolitionist campaigners, such as William Wilberforce. Porteus's passionate sermons against slavery helped raise awareness and mobilize public opinion. In 1787, Porteus was transferred to the Diocese of London, becoming one of the most influential churchmen in the country. He continued his advocacy for social reform, promoting education for the poor, prison reform, and the alleviation of poverty. Porteus left a legacy as a progressive and socially conscious bishop who used his position to champion important causes such as the abolition of slavery and social reform. The work which appears here is the first American edition of the publication that served as a eulogy for Archbishop Thomas Secker, the Archbishop of Canterbury and a proponent of establishing an American Episcopate. Porteus defends Secker against ministers like Jonathan Mayhew and Charles Chauncy, who opposed the appointment of bishops in the American colonies. Porteus criticizes their "unreasonable and groundless Jealousies of the Church of England" and clarifies that the intention behind the appointments was not to establish the Church of England as the dominant religion in America. The work highlights the religious and political conflicts of the time and demonstrates Porteus's loyalty to the Church of England. Present here is also the appendix to this American edition of Porteus's work which was written by Chandler. The appendix includes an introductory narrative by Chandler as well as excerpts of a letter written by Archbishop Secker addressing the irregular conduct of the Reverend Mr. Macclanechan. This group of works represents points of view in the influential pamphlet wars that enveloped discourse on the role of the Church of England in the colonies, the legitimacy of British rule, the nature of religious freedom, and the rights of the colonists. All of which are debates that informed the intellectual landscape that shaped the path toward American independence.

Sabin 11875 (Appeal Further Defended); Sabin 16585 (Address from the Clergy); Sabin 11878 (Free Examintion of the Critical Commentary); Evans 12960, ESTC W29061 (A Review of the Life & Character of Archbishop Secker); Evans 13192.

Item #40238

Price: $4,500.00