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Derwent Water. After James Baker PYNE.

Derwent Water

Manchester: Thomas Agnew & Sons, 1853. Lithograph by W. Gauci, printed in tints by M. & N. Hanhart, coloured by hand. Very good condition apart from some overall light soiling and minor foxing. Image size (including text): 15 1/2 x 20 1/2 inches. Sheet size: 17 1/4 x 24 1/2 inches.

An evocative image of the Lake District, an area renowned as the cradle of the Romantic Movement in Britain.

The Lake District, an area of only some 700 square miles, contains all the main English lakes and is found within the northwestern counties of Cumbria and Lancashire. 'The Lakes' (as the area is also known) first came to prominence with the rise of the cult of the Picturesque in the second half of the 18th century, but it was Wordsworth, a native of Cumbria, born in 1770 on the outskirts of the Lake District itself, who really made it a mecca for those in search of the romantic ideal of landscape. He was joined in the area, at one time or another, by Robert Southey, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Percy Bysshe Shelley, John Keats, Lord Byron, Sir Walter Scott, Thomas de Quincey and many others. By the middle of the 19th century, when the present image was produced, the area was well established in the national consciousness as the area of outstanding natural beauty in England. Bristol-born James Baker Pyne is now considered by many to have been second only to Turner in his ability to capture the essence of the English landscape. After training initially for the Law, he turned to painting in his twenties. He moved to London in 1835, where he exhibited at the Royal Academy and the Society of British Artists (where he later became vice president). He travelled widely throughout Britain and Europe, but he is perhaps best known for his series of views of the Lakes, painted between 1848 and 1851.

Cf. Abbey Scenery 196 (1859 edition); cf. Tooley 387.

Item #9075

Price: $750.00

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